Coming Full Circle on Scale Out vs. Scale Up

When I first started with virtualization, the only option you had at the time was single core processors in the hosts. Scale up or scale out was the hot debatable topic when designing your infrastructure.  On one side of the coin the idea was to scale up in that it was best to get a few of the biggest servers you could find and load them up with as much memory and processors that you could fit in the box.  The end result were some very expensive servers able to run a lot of virtual machines for its time.  The other side of the coin presented the idea that it was better to scale out with more, smaller servers to make up the cluster.  I have worked in both type of environments and attitudes over the years and as for me, personally, I aligned myself with the scale out philosophy.  The simple reason for aligning with the scale out group was host failure.  When you have sixty to eighty virtual machines per host and lose that host it was really a lot of eggs in one basket and took some time to recover.  When you have more, smaller servers, then the shock of losing a host was not as severe because there were not as many virtual machines running on single host and it would take less time to recover.  This was during the time before vCenter, vMotion, HA and DRS when it was just you and the VMware ESX hosts. Continue reading Coming Full Circle on Scale Out vs. Scale Up

Akorri and Xangati Raise the Infrastructure Performance Management Bar

When discussing Virtualization Performance Management, we separate the vendors that focus upon this area in to three groups:

  • Resource and Availability Management – this group of vendors focuses upon collecting the resource utilization metrics that are made available by the virtualization platform vendors for the purposes of capacity planning, capacity management, and ensuring the overall availability of the environment. Leaders in this category include Vizioncore (vFoglight), Veeam (Veeam Monitor), VMware (Hyperic), Hyper9, Netuitive, and Zenoss. Continue reading Akorri and Xangati Raise the Infrastructure Performance Management Bar

Why Cloud.com is NOT a drowning turkey

We recently annoyed Peder Ulander of Cloud.com by suggesting when Cloud.com joined OpenStack it was a Turkey waiting for Thanksgiving.  It wasn’t personal, but we do understand that being compared to a fat bird with a big neck can cause offense.  To calm things down we spoke to Peder, and we thought Virtualization Practice readers might be interested in the conversation. Continue reading Why Cloud.com is NOT a drowning turkey

Presentation Virtualization: what can VMworld do for me lately?

VMworld is clearly a Very Big Virtualization Conference – possibly the largest. Yet, does it cover all virtualization topics? If you’re from a  Presentation Virtualization (PV) background (although  maybe you know it as Terminal Services (TS); possibly even a Microsoft Remote Desktop Services (RDS); heck lets go on an old school ‘server based computing’ perspective):

‘what could VMworld do for me?’

The answer is:

“Quite a lot.”

I know: you’re shocked: I was bemused too. From a PV perspective there are a number of vendors worth your while to to go and see. I’m not going: wish I was now.

Continue reading Presentation Virtualization: what can VMworld do for me lately?

VMworld Pilgrimage Part 2

In my Preparing for the VMworld Pilgrimage post last week, I went over some things, namely hotel and airfare, which you should have confirmed by now if you are planning on attending VMworld 2010 in San Francisco.  I have heard through the grapevine that there are going to be around 15,000 people in attendance this year so it is shaping to be another great event.  This post is going with the assumption that your travel, logging, sessions and labs have been booked and taken care of. With that said, what is the best way to stay current and get the most out of the week?  I would like to present the thought that the VMTN Community Lounge / Blogger Area is a good place to start.  If you are looking to meet some of the most active individuals in virtualization, this will be a place that you should consider checking in periodically throughout the week. Continue reading VMworld Pilgrimage Part 2

Monitoring as a Service (MaaS)

These days the rush seems afoot to try to make everything into a service and deliver everything as a service. Some examples are:

  • You can get storage with products like Amazon S3, Microsoft Windows Azure Blob Storage, Nirvanix, EMC Atmos Online, Meezeo, Zetta, and Dropbox
  • You can get Infrastructure as a Service (Iaas) which is really a server and an operating system with the underlying infrastructure as a service via Amazon EC2, and a variety of hosting and cloud providers who offer both VMware compatible and other variants
  • You can get an applications Platform as a Service (PaaS) via products like EngineYard, the joint offering by VMware and SalesForce.com – VMForce, and the Google AppEngine cloud
  • You can get a full Software application as a Service (SaaS) via products like SalesForce.com, NetSuite and hundreds of other providers Continue reading Monitoring as a Service (MaaS)