Rackspace Hijacks OpenStack

Call me a bore, but Open Source Governance models would be my “Specialist Subject” on a quiz show.  It’s not that I have studied Open Source Governance, it’s more that I have lived it. A s a member of the Board of Directors of Eclipse I worked extensively with both Skip McGaughey who originally set up Eclipse as an entity inside IBM, and with Mike Milinkovich who took it over as an independent entity, and I know the pain that the originating organization has to go through to let go of its baby, and the pain that an independent director goes through to finally wrest the baby from its parent’s grasp, and the benefits to the originating organization and to the community at large when it all happens.  I also know that Rackspace has gone through none of that pain in setting up OpenStack,  it has got the OpenStack governance model spectacularly wrong, and as a result the whole initiative is in peril.

The OpenStack Governance Document bears an uncanny resemblance to George Orwell’s Animal Farm.  You may remember that various animals got together to throw out the humans with the slogan “All Animals are Equal”, but that over time the slogan migrated to “All Animals Are Equal, but some are More Equal than Others” as the Pigs gained control and became indistinguishable from the humans they threw out.  OpenStack was created with a similar sentiment: let’s throw out Eucalyptus and create a community programme where all contributors are equal. What has emerged in the governance model is  “All Contributors are Equal, but Rackspace is more equal than others”.  All the key positions, and a majority on the decision-making bodies are reserved for Rackspace.  Rackspace, like the Pigs in Animal Farm, has subverted the revolution. Continue reading Rackspace Hijacks OpenStack

How Many VM’s Can I Run?

I saw a question get posted on twitter that kind of intrigues me a little.  The question was pretty straight forward. “How many virtual machines should I be able to run on a host?”   That is really a fair question in itself but what I find intriguing is that this is the first question he asks.  Is this really the first thing administrators think to ask when designing their environment?   After all there is no set formula on how many virtual machines you can run on a host.  You can be a little more exact when working with VDI because for the most part all the virtual machines would be set up pretty much the same way and the numbers can be a little more predictable.  That would not be the case when working with server virtualization.  You are going to have servers all with different configurations and amount of resources provisioned to the virtual machines.  This variation is what will change your slot count and the amount of virtual machines you can run on the host. Continue reading How Many VM’s Can I Run?

Pano Logic delivers Hyper-V support in Pano System 3.5

Pano Logic announced today the release of Pano System 3.5, which adds support for Microsoft Hyper-V the alongside VMware vSphere.
Every new product release tells the story, not only do we get to learn about how a vendor’s marketing department wants others to see its products, but we also learn how that vendor sees its marketplace.  Today’s release by Pano Logic of Pano System 3.5 is a case in point.  The most significant new feature, certainly the one that Pano Logic are drawing the most attention to in Pano System 3.5 is support for Microsoft Hyper-V alongside VMware vSphere.  It is interesting to see a startup like Pano Logic devoting its resources not to additional functionality, but instead to improving cross-platform compatibility.  Pano Logic must be closely monitoring Microsoft’s market share in its target markets and recognizing an opportunity to squeeze out VMware View, and compete head-on with the likes of Quest vWorkspace and Kaviza VDI-in-a-Box in the SMB market. Continue reading Pano Logic delivers Hyper-V support in Pano System 3.5

Does Public or Private make a difference to Cloud Security?

When we talk about Cloud Security, the main concept is to separate, as an example, Coke from Pepsi. This implies that Tenant’s cannot impact the availability of each others data, the integrity of that data, and the confidentiality of that data. But what does this actually mean? Does this apply to all types of clouds in the same way?

There are three types of cloud families: Private, Hybrid, Public. There are at least 3 types of clouds: SaaS, PaaS, and IaaS. Do the same rules for one cloud family work for all cloud families? as well as for the types of clouds?

I believe the answer is yes. Continue reading Does Public or Private make a difference to Cloud Security?

The Effects of Virtualization on Data Center Power and Cooling

Although virtualization technologies have been a great help to data center managers looking to reclaim power in an overburdened environment, virtualization can also create problems. As IT organizations complete their server virtualization initiatives and as their virtualization management skills mature, use of the physical server power management features and dynamic workload shifting capabilities will increase. This, coupled with increased adoption of server hosted desktop virtualization, will create new opportunities for improving the efficiency of data center power and cooling systems, as well as new challenges for keeping up with increasing demand.