Presentation Virtualization, a year in review

PresentationVirtualizationWay back in January, when 2010 still had that showroom fresh smell we released Presentation Virtualization Solutions whitepaper; the year wasn’t half way through before that was updated and its being defrosted as we speak to enable updates going into 2011. Its been an eventful year for Presentation Virtualization. Continue reading Presentation Virtualization, a year in review

Virtualization Review 2010

It is the last few days of the year and time for a review of virtualization 2010.  Although VMware was founded in 1998 it was not until 2001 that I first heard of VMware and played with the Workstation product to be able to run different flavors of Linux.  So for me, 2010 closes out a great year in virtualization as a whole as well as a decade of virtualization…  and what a ride it has been!

Staying focused on 2010 we have had a few things that have been worthy to note.  This year we have moved past defining what a “cloud” is and really starting to discuss  how we are going to “secure the cloud.” The term “cloud computing” still leads the way as one of the biggest buzz word with most all people and companies now having heard of it are planning one way or another on deployment options into their own environments. One thing for sure is the need for fully qualified individuals to maintain and designs the clouds moving forward. Continue reading Virtualization Review 2010

Virtualization Security: Year in Review

My conference schedule kept pace with the changes in the virtualization security ecosystem throughout the year.  What are those changes?

IT as a Service Reference Architecture

For an IT department these are perilous times indeed. All around you public cloud vendors are offering IT services on an easy to procure, elastic and often inexpensive basis. Many of the developers in your organization may have already concluded that getting resources provisioned for development and test projects is easier at Amazon.com than it is through your internally offered processes. If you are aware that this is happening you can console yourself by saying, “it is only development – not production”, but you should wonder what should you do to make sure that those workloads come back when they do go into production. Continue reading IT as a Service Reference Architecture

Desktop Virtualization: How do Wanova offer a Mirage?

It has been said before desktop virtualization can be hard. The virtual desktop may have become real, but it is not mainstream. Is this because current virtual desktop deployment models are not mature enough, or the models are flawed?

Desktop management is expensive if it is unmanaged on a LAN: it is most expensive when those unmanaged desktops are distributed (be it across regional offices, or roaming users, or both). Centralisation can reduce these costs, putting you in a position where the IT you manage enables, rather than disables, the business. However, centralisation of desktop services is costly.

Centralisation solutions either focus on solutions that require a large investment in data-centre resources (such as Desktop Virtualization or Presentation Virtualization), or require you to separate management functions and duplicate administrative effort (mix VDI with A.N Other solution).  UniDesk, for example, have looked to re-invent how centralised virtualised desktops are managed; MokaFive and VirtualComputer have enterprise ready options for managing workspace delivery to devices but there is a requirement to deploy and manage a hypervisor on the end device. If your goal is to manage what you have better to reduce your costs – do you have to have hypervisors; do you have to remote your desktop?

Wanova have developed a Distributed Desktop Virtualization (DDV) solution – Mirage – with which they look to solve issues of desktop management with distributed environments, without the need for hypervisors, without the need for expensive data-centre resources and remoting protocols. In this article we’ll take a look at the challenges of desktop delivery, how Mirage works and how can it impact your desktop management.

By definition, a Mirage is a displaced image of distant objects, rather than an hallucination. Can Wanova offer the facility to deliver virtualised desktops to disparate devices – or are they just making it up?

Continue reading Desktop Virtualization: How do Wanova offer a Mirage?