vCloud Security

On the 2/24 Virtualization Security Podcast we were joined by Davi Ottenheimer and Michael Haines of VMware to discuss vCloud security. This is of quite a bit of interest to many people these days. As VMware adds more and more Cloud functionality, how to secure the environment is becoming more and more important. The podcast started with the question what aspects of the cloud do customers want secured. The answer was intriguing to say the least. Continue reading vCloud Security


On the third Virtualization Security Podcast of 2011 we were joined by Charlton Barreto of Intel to further discuss the possibility of using TPM/TXT to enhance security within the virtual and cloud environments. We are not there yet, but we discussed in depth the issues with bringing hardware based integrity and confidentiality up further into the virtualized layers of the cloud. TPM and TXT currently provide the following per host security: Continue reading TPM/TXT Redux

Virtualization Performance and Availability Monitoring – A Reference Architecture

In “A Perfect Storm in Availability and Performance Monitoring“, we proposed that legacy products from the physical environment should not be brought over into your new virtualized environment and that you should in fact start over with a horizontally layered approach, choosing a scaled out, and highly flexible product that can integrate with products at adjacent layers. In this post we will propose a Reference Architecture which can be used to accomplish this. Continue reading Virtualization Performance and Availability Monitoring – A Reference Architecture

Licensing VDI for Microsoft Desktops – is it rocket science?

On Feb 24, the US Space shuttle Discovery took off from Kennedy Space Centre for its final mission. At its launch, Discovery will have completed 38 voyages and traveled 230 million kilometers.  In 1970 approximately 200,000 miles from Earth in a damaged spacecraft, new protocols were  designed and new equipment re-created from spare parts in order to bring astronauts safely back to earth. In 1961 the first man entered space and come 1969, man was walking on the moon. Continue reading Licensing VDI for Microsoft Desktops – is it rocket science?

Virtualization and Cloud Conferences for the Year

It is often very hard to plan which virtualization and cloud conferences to attend and why. You may need to start your planning now as justification from work could be hard to come by. It may mean you make the decision to go on your own dime. If you do the later, there are some alternative mechanisms that could work for the bigger conferences. The conferences and events I attend every year depend on my status with the organization hosting those events, and whether or not I can get a ‘deal’ as a speaker, analyst, or blogger. So what conferences do I find worth attending? That will also depend on your job role. There is one I would attend regardless of role, and a few I would attend as a Virtualization and Cloud Security person. All are good conferences. So here is my list: Continue reading Virtualization and Cloud Conferences for the Year

VMware sends mixed message with View 4.6

Last weeks release of View 4.6 was as notable for what it included as what was absent.

When VMware first announced that it was going to license Teradici’s PCoIP protocol for inclusion in View 4.0, its most visible shortcoming was that VMware did not plan to update the View Security Server at the same time. Setting aside any debate as to the performance characteristics of PCoIP on the WAN, the lack of support for the View Security Server was a significant obstacle to widespread adoption of View in enterprise environments. So the inclusion of direct support for PCoIP tunneling through the View 4.6 Security Server comes as a most welcome update. Also included with View 4.6 are new USB enhancements, as well as support for Windows 7 SP1. Continue reading VMware sends mixed message with View 4.6