Why would a Developer choose VMware?

It is interesting to see Edward’s comment that according to EMC/VMware, widespread production deployment of Cloud Apps is 3-5 years off.  If that is the case the VMware CloudFoundry initiative should be focused on cutting-edge development rather than porting existing apps, and in much the same way that Microsoft has always courted developers, CloudFoundry should be the latest cool thing for developer productivity. It’s interesting to talk about this stuff in the abstract, and at the strategic level, but sometimes it’s worth understanding what happens when you need to make the decisions for yourself.

So, although I’m more of an Architect than a Developer I’m knocking up a prototype application – this isn’t a thought experiment I really am building a real prototype with a view to showing to a real enterprise customer (in fact several), but it’s not being built for one specific customer so there aren’t any pre-defined corporate standards on the technology that I have to build it on.  Continue reading Why would a Developer choose VMware?

Tripwire Inc. Acquired

In 2008 Tripwire made itself known in the virtualization space with the release of two free tools, Tripwire’s ConfigCheck and OpsCheck. By the time 2009 came around, Tripwire was getting itself fully established in the virtual space for the release of its new product, Tripwire’s vWire. vWire was released in the summer of 2009 and then killed by the end of that year as Tripwire shifted its focus to an acquisition it made for log management to expand the capabilities of its flagship product, Tripwire Enterprise.

Although Tripwire seemed to completely drop of the face of the earth, at least from the virtualization space, they continued to grow and expand in the Security and Compliance space led by the continued success of Tripwire Enterprise.   All seemed to be going well for Tripwire as they filed for an IPO with the SEC and continued on its way to going public.

It seems those plans for going public have changed, or at the very least, delayed.  It has been announced that the private equity investment firm Thoma Bravo has entered into an agreement to purchase Tripwire Inc for undisclosed terms. Thoma Bravo has quite the portfolio with investments in companies like Attachmate Corporation, LANDesk Software Inc. and SonicWALL Inc. to name a few.  I do not think Tripwire Inc will focus on the virtualization space specificately and will continue down the path of being able to monitor and report on as many different types of hardware in the infrastructure that it can.  It’s lack of focus on cloud computing or virtualization in general may really come back to haunt Tripwire in the near future, but they are jumping on to the bandwagon by changing the marketing approach to add mention of the securing the cloud. “Secured by Tripwire – IT Security and Compliance for Cloud and Managed Service Providers”. I really think Tripwire is going to have to work on expanding its own portfolio itself by continuing to innovate and expand its horizons. I was working for Tripwire throughout the creation and release of vWire and have nothing but good things to say about the people and the company itself.  I found Tripwire to be an absolutely wonderful place to work and I wish them well and continued success moving forward.

Monitoring SQL Server Performance on VMware vSphere

VMware has recently posted an article up on its Communities site in the Business Critical Applications section about monitoring SQL Servers that are supporting a business critical application running in a vSphere environment. If this is how VMware thinks critical infrastructure services (database servers, applications servers, web servers, messaging servers, etc.) that support business critical applications should be monitored then it is no wonder that so many customers are struggling to get their business critical application virtualized. Continue reading Monitoring SQL Server Performance on VMware vSphere

Can the Vendors Eat Their Own Dog Food on Cloud Billing?

I keep hearing we are now in a Cloud based world, I keep hearing that to “Do Cloud” properly you need to bill like a utility company, small standing charge and then a charge per unit used. I like this model, pay for what you use. it is great for the clients as they are in control of their costs they know that if they use X amount of time they get charged XX amount of Dollars. So what is the problem? The very business model that the cloud providers are peddling is being undermined by the vendors telling the providers that it is the way you should charge but not charging that way themselves. There are two cost models:

VMware Buys Shavlik

VMware has acquired one more company: Shavlik. This acquisition did not come as much of a surprise to me but is an interesting purchase for VMware.  There are quite a few Security as a Service vendors that would make sense for VMware to purchase and Shavlik is one of them. The difference between the other vendors and Shavlik is that VMware has a existing track record with Shavlik as Shavlik is integral in two of VMware’s existing products: VMware Go and VMware Update Manager. Shavlik provides a very important patch management system for these existing products and is one line of defense in the security space. Are there other plans for Shavlik? Or this is a way to lock in one set of tools? Continue reading VMware Buys Shavlik

Is Gluster the answer to Scalable Cloud Storage and the Amazon Outage?

One of the differentiating features of an IaaS cloud implementation, is that you do not get access to a consolidated scalable storage infrastructure. At least not in the same way that you might expect if you were just scaling out compute nodes attached to the same SAN.  You get remote block storage (Elastic Block Storage, EBS, in the case of Amazon) connected to a specific machine image, and you get REST-style object storage (Simple Storage Service, S3, in the case of Amazon) which is shared amongst images but does n0t speak the traditional APIs.

A lot of people have become dependent on EBS as it seems closest to what they are used to. Amazon failed because of simultaneous failure of its EBS  in two Availability zones.  If you were dependent on one of these (or mirrored across the two) you lost access to the filesystem from your Instances. It is also worth noting that EBS images are not like CIFS or NFS filesystems in that they can only be attached from a single instance, so you are still left with a bunch of headaches if you have a replicated mid-tier that expects to see a filesystem (for example to retrieve unstructured data). It may be sensible to move to the use of the S3 mechanism (or some portable abstraction over it) for new applications, but if you have an existing application that expects to see a filesystem in the traditional way, this will require you to rewrite your code, so you are left looking for a distributed cloud-agnostic shared filesystem with multi-way replication (including asynchronous replication), and this is where Gluster fits in. Continue reading Is Gluster the answer to Scalable Cloud Storage and the Amazon Outage?

Cloud Computing News, Resources, and Analysis