VMware View Client and Citirix Receiver for iPad – truly free of charge?

Arriving fashionably late to the party in March VMware have  launched the View Client for the iPad.

The announcement was doubtless welcomed by iPad owning View users and brings VMware in line with the competition. Citirix and Quest both have an iPad client for their respective solutions; with a number of vendors, including iTap, Jaadu, Wyse providing RDP clients via Apple’s Appstore.

While some vendors have a charge for their iPad client – VMware has followed in the practice of Citrix and Quest and made their client free for download.

Yet, there is no such thing as a free lunch. While there may be no charge for the client app, is there a cost implication to the business? And of course, I’ve written “iPad” but as the iPhone loses to ground to the wealth of Android devices, it would be fair to say that the question of “what-is-the-cost-of-connecting-to-your-services-with-a-new-generation-mobile-thing” covers a range of devices that are being brought into the work place: not only the cool tablet de jour courtesy of Mr Ive, but the ever more popular Android smartphones and tablet devices such as the Motorola Xoom or the Samsung Galaxy Tab.

There may be an executive clamor to introduce these devices, the cost of installing the relevant client may appear to be nothing and the services of IT may not be needed to perform the installation – but, what licenses need to be available to allow access using these new kids on the block?

How free is a free VDI client on a tablet or a smartphone? Continue reading VMware View Client and Citirix Receiver for iPad – truly free of charge?

ITaaS: Managing Software Costs within Hybrid Clouds

In a comment thread, from the article Multiple Hybrid Clouds Kludged Together? — Cloud Architecture, an insight was raised.

“… companies are not managing their software proactively to ensure they are staying in budget.” — Cary King.

This raised a few hairs on the back of my head, as I, Edward Haletky (Texiwill), recently went shopping for cloud services and some of the prices were outrageous to say the least for just a basic VM, if I suddenly needed more VMs the numbers would add up quickly to something outside of the budget. On top of that, there is the utilization charge back for cloud services. This particular Cloud Provider could not tell me what the rules for such charge backs. In a private or hybrid cloud, licensing costs for software and operating systems could eat through any budget in next to no time. Add in utilization charge back and budgets may be crushed under the weight of all these new charges. Continue reading ITaaS: Managing Software Costs within Hybrid Clouds

Microsoft’s new Client Access License snubs desktop virtualization

A change to the Microsoft Client Access License (CAL) bundle is a rare event – the last time it happened was about 10 years ago; so any change to the CAL bundle has to be seen as a significant indicator of Microsoft’s core values. Or so you would think.  Assuming that is right, last week’s announcement at the Microsoft Management Summit of  changes to the Core and Enterprise CAL bundles need careful analysis. Changes to the CAL are a strategic driver towards new product adoption and represents a clear indication of Microsoft’s long-term goals and aspirations. With that in mind we can infer from this latest change how Microsoft views desktop virtualization. Continue reading Microsoft’s new Client Access License snubs desktop virtualization

Using Microsoft SCOM to Manage the Performance of Virtualized Applications on vSphere

In “Performance Management Equals Response Time, not Resource Utilization“, we made the point that in order for you to be allowed (by the application owners) to virtualize business critical and performance critical applications that you (the team that owns the virtual infrastructure) are going to have to step up to managing the performance of applications on terms agreed to by applications owners. Continue reading Using Microsoft SCOM to Manage the Performance of Virtualized Applications on vSphere

Multiple Hybrid Clouds Kludged Together? — Cloud Architecture

With the diversity of cloud’s available today, data being sent from one to another could appear to be a hodge-podge of security. As one colleague put it recently when I asked what he was expecting to maintain integrity of data in motion between clouds:

… what kind of kludge can things end up being when you have multiple connections to multiple hybrid clouds all doing different things” — Steve Beaver

So how does data transfer between the clouds? Is it a kludge? or can it be done using a uniform security policy, procedures, and protocols while maintaining Integrity and Confidentiality and auditability? Continue reading Multiple Hybrid Clouds Kludged Together? — Cloud Architecture