Big Data Security Tools

VirtualizationSecurityOn the May 30th Virtualization Security Podcast, Michael Webster (@vcdxnz001) joined us Live from HP Discover to discuss what we found at the show and other similar tools around the industry. The big data security news was a loosely coupled product named HAVEn which is derived from several products: Hadoop, Autonomy, Vertica, Enterprise Security, and any number of Apps. HAVEn’s main goal is to provide a platform on top of which HP and others can produce big data applications using Autonomy for unstructured data, Vertica for structured data, Enterprise Security for data governance and hadoop. HP has already built several security tools upon HAVEn, and I expect more. Even so, HAVEn is not the only tools to provide this functionality, but it may be the only one to include data governance in from the beginning. Continue reading Big Data Security Tools

VMware to Revolutionize Operations Management with Log Insight

PerformanceManagementVMware has announced its log management product – Log Insight. Log Insight is priced at $200 per monitored OS instance (per VM pricing) and is to be available in Q3 of this year. VMware’s own vSphere environment is the first targeted environment, and the two first use cases is Operations Management. Right now this is clearly a 1.0 offering competing with a very mature Splunk Enterprise offering – but there are some very interesting short term and long term dynamics at play. Continue reading VMware to Revolutionize Operations Management with Log Insight

The Many Faces of PaaS

By now, enterprises understand the value of Software as a Service (SaaS) and Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS), but there still is much confusion about Platform as a Service (PaaS). This confusion is one reason why enterprises have been slow to adopt PaaS. Why is there so much confusion? Because PaaS is still in its early days of maturity, but it is growing up really quickly right before our eyes. Continue reading The Many Faces of PaaS

Vegas as a Service

CloudComputingRecently when I was in Las Vegas for HP Discover1 I realized that the Venetian/Palazzo complex is really a cloud: Vegas as a Service. IT could learn a lot from Las Vegas, actually; I think that each hotel complex is a private cloud, and that taken together the strip is one big cloud. Granted it is a cloud that has a single purpose, but has all the earmarks of a good cloud.
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The Potential of the Dell PowerEdge VRTX

Dell PowerEdge VRTXDell PowerEdge VRTXRight now is a particularly interesting time in the world of IT. Historically, IT has swung back & forth between centralization and decentralization, closed and open, tightly controlled and loosely controlled. Lately, though, a third option has cropped up: centralized control with decentralized workloads. In my opinion it’s a function of speed, implemented through bandwidth and processing capacity. We now have enough bandwidth between our devices to start treating the device in the next rack column like a slightly-less-local version of ourselves. We also have enough bandwidth that we’ve outstripped our need for separate storage and data networks, and can converge them into a single wire, running a single set of protocols (most notably TCP and IP). On the processing side, each node is basically a datacenter unto itself. 16, 32, 64 cores per server, terabytes of RAM. The advent of SSD and PCIe flash rounds out the package, lessening the need for large monolithic collections of spindles (aka “traditional storage arrays”). The problem then becomes one of control. How do we take advantage of the performance and cost that local processing brings, but maintain all the control, redundancy, and management benefits we had with a monolithic solution, while keeping the complexity under control? And while we usually talk about doing this at great scale, can we do this on a small scale, too?

Dell PowerEdge VRTX Continue reading The Potential of the Dell PowerEdge VRTX

The Pros and Cons of Private and Public PaaS

Agile Cloud DevelopmentI just returned from attending the Cloud Expo in New York City this week. The conference was dominated by private and hybrid cloud topics. There were several private Platform as a Service (PaaS) vendors attending whom I spent a great deal of time talking to as I walked the floor. It seems these days that many enterprises default to private and hybrid clouds and therefore insist on private PaaS as well. It is critical that consumers of PaaS services understand the pros and cons of both public and private PaaS before making a commitment to a PaaS deployment model. Continue reading The Pros and Cons of Private and Public PaaS