All posts by Edward Haletky

Edward L. Haletky, aka Texiwill, is the author of VMware vSphere(TM) and Virtual Infrastructure Security: Securing the Virtual Environment as well as VMware ESX and ESXi in the Enterprise: Planning Deployment of Virtualization Servers, 2nd Edition. Edward owns AstroArch Consulting, Inc., providing virtualization, security, network consulting and development and The Virtualization Practice where he is also an Analyst. Edward is the Moderator and Host of the Virtualization Security Podcast as well as a guru and moderator for the VMware Communities Forums, providing answers to security and configuration questions. Edward is working on new books on Virtualization. [All Papers/Publications...]

When a SaaS Goes Away

CloudComputingSaaS is supposed to be ubiquitous, and never go down. But what if the SaaS you are using suddenly goes away, closes up shop, or places the part you are using in an unsupported mode? For some SaaS offerings (such as a game) this may not be a big deal, but for others (such as a CRM) it has huge consequences—ones that can affect your business in subtle and major ways.

Continue reading When a SaaS Goes Away

Should We Care If the Handheld Is Secure?

VirtualizationSecurityAndroid devices recently suffered a spate of attacks. Similar attacks have been made against Apple devices and nearly every other brand of smart device. Does this mean that this is the end of Android or of mobile devices? Or does this mark the rise of mobile device management (MDM) and other software specifically designed to secure end user computing (EUC) devices? EUC security has two failure points: the handheld device and further in the network. But does an insecure device imply loss of data? Perhaps. Loss of credentials? Once more, perhaps. But do we really care? That is not known. So, let us look at a typical use case. Continue reading Should We Care If the Handheld Is Secure?

IT Transformation: SME

BusinessAgilityThere are many reasons to use cloud resources, and there are many reasons to enter the cloud, of which we have spoken about fairly regularly as part of our IT Transformation series. The real question is: “When should you use cloud services?” Or, more to the point, “When should you use new cloud services in control of IT and not the business?” That is really the crux of the discussion; business users use cloud resources all the time. The choice to use them is based on getting your job done and not IT’s decisions. We often call this “shadow IT,” but is it? Let us look at a few examples and decide—is it shadow IT (as in, should be in IT’s hands to control?), or  is it part of doing business and therefore a business decision? Does the definition change as we grow a business or change the scale of the business? Continue reading IT Transformation: SME

The Substrates of IT

CloudComputingAs technologists and analysts for the virtualization and cloud spaces, we are always talking about various places within the IT stack. Actually, as we talked about within the article Technical Arc of Virtualization, we have noticed that many people are moving up the IT stack, forming new and more interesting substrates of IT. These substrates are used to simplify the actions one takes to deploy new and more interesting applications, while at the same time abstracting away the physical and virtual layers of the stack—in essence, forming new substrates on top of which to build. Continue reading The Substrates of IT

IT Transformation: Show Back

CloudComputingThe last part of our IT transformation series is on show-back. The final—some say the first—component of using any cloud for Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) is cost. We plan to use a cloud to save on costs, but we have to be able to prove we will save money. Unfortunately, with all the approaches to IT transformation—top-down, migration, no changes to management—the truth is that excessive cloud use could turn into massive costs. Those costs, if not handled properly, will end up hamstringing any IT transformation after it happens. The answer is show-back. Continue reading IT Transformation: Show Back

Scale-Out Is a Benefit to HyperConverged

DataCenterVirtualizationI recently upgraded my nodes from 96 GB of memory to 256 GB of memory, and someone on Twitter stated the following:

@Texiwill thought the trend today is scale out not scale up? #cloud

The implication was that you never upgrade your hardware: you buy new or you enter the cloud. Granted, both options are beneficial. However, buying new and adding to your environment may not be necessary, and you most likely have already entered the cloud with the use of SaaS applications and perhaps some IaaS. The question still remains: upgrade, enhance existing hardware, or buy net new somewhere? When should you do any of these? Or should you at all? Continue reading Scale-Out Is a Benefit to HyperConverged