All posts by Mike Kavis

Mike is a VP/Principal Architect for Cloud Technology Partners. Mike has served in numerous technical roles such as CTO, Chief Architect, and VP positions with over 25 years of experience in software development and architecture. A pioneer in cloud computing, Mike led a team that built the world's first high speed transaction network in Amazon's public cloud and won the 2010 AWS Global Startup Challenge. An expert in cloud security, Mike is currently writing a book for Wiley Publishing called "Architecting the Cloud: Design Decisions for Cloud Computing Service Models (IaaS, PaaS, SaaS)" which is expected to be released in late 2013.

HashiCorp Launches First Commercial DevOps Product

agilecloudHashiCorp, a San Francisco–based start-up founded in 2012, has recently released its first commercial product, called Atlas. HashiCorp is known by many people as the creator of a number of open-source tools that assist in developing, deploying, and maintaining applications. One major challenge for IT shops is that so many tools are required to automate the building and delivery of software that engineers spend far too much time trying to tie all of these tools together, which takes away time from working on business requests. In many shops, one or more people may be dedicated to managing the complexities of the DevOps tool chain, which includes integration, patching, upgrading, and many other non–value added tasks. With Atlas, engineers can leverage a single tool for managing infrastructure and builds with a common workflow and a central dashboard.

HashiCorp takes a page from the Atlassian playbook. Atlassian focuses on integrating a collection of open-source tools for agile development, such as JIRA, Confluence, HipChat, and others. HashiCorp brings together a collection of open-source tools to aid in the delivery and management of applications and infrastructure. Atlas is made up of five major functions, as represented in the following image:

Source: Hashicorp
Source: Hashicorp

Vagrant, Packer, Terraform, and Consul are all open-source projects that you can download and use for free today. Atlas provides a common platform that makes all of these open-source solutions work together seamlessly and is delivered as SaaS. In addition, Atlas handles the integrations with various CI/CD tools (Maven, Jenkins, etc.), containers and VMs (Docker, VMware, VirtualBox, and eventually Rocket), version control (GitHub and Bitbucket), configuration management (Chef, Puppet, Ansible, and Salt), public cloud providers (AWS, Google, Rackspace and Azure), and private cloud providers (OpenStack and SoftLayer). Doing these integrations yourself would require a significant amount of time and money, and it would be a never-ending task to keep everything current. Atlas provides these capabilities out of the box and will continue to add integrations as the demand for new tools arises.

Many organizations live in a multicloud world. I have seen where engineers have written thousands upon thousands of lines of code in Chef or Puppet, trying to manage the many permutations of cloud endpoints, applications stacks, and containers and VMs. Tools like Atlas to allow you to build a common workflow that can deliver a Docker container to AWS in the same way in which you could deliver a VM to a private cloud without major development. The goal of Atlas is to simplify the process of getting code from development to production by making infrastructure management and application delivery easier.

The company also announced $10 million in Series A funding from Mayfield, GGV Capital, and True Ventures.

Are You Drinking Your Own DevOps Kool-Aid?

agilecloudI am starting to get annoyed with the direction of all the DevOps discussions that fly across my Twitter feed each day. I think people are focusing way too much on culture and not taking a pragmatic approach to solving business problems. I’ll be the first to admit that embracing the DevOps movement can be transformational and in some cases a major culture shock to large organizations. But there is much more to DevOps than culture.

Continue reading Are You Drinking Your Own DevOps Kool-Aid?

Unicorns, Horses, ITIL, and Enterprise DevOps


“DevOps” is one of those buzzwords that means everything and nothing at the same time. It is like the words “cloud,” “architecture,” and “Internet of Things”—terms so vague they lead to endless debates between IT people. DevOps seems to take this verbal sparring to a new level. On top of arguing over what it means, people also debate the proper method for delivering DevOps. Notice that “method” is singular, as if there were only one way to do it. 

Continue reading Unicorns, Horses, ITIL, and Enterprise DevOps

DevOps: Stop Talking and Start Doing

agilecloudIf you are like me, you are probably tired of the endless articles talking about DevOps. Each day, you are guaranteed to see an onslaught of articles on the following topics:

  • What Is DevOps?
  • DevOps Is a Culture Change
  • DevOps Requires Empathy
  • DevOps Unicorns, or All Unicorns Started Out as Horses
  • Buy My DevOps Tools (from many vendors)
  • The Wall between Dev and Ops.

Continue reading DevOps: Stop Talking and Start Doing

Jaspersoft BI Platform Adds Big Data Capabilities

tibcoJaspersoft, an industry-leading BI platform, has announced its first release since being acquired by TIBCO back in April. With version 5.6, Jaspersoft has enhanced its platform with a new big data connectivity architecture and new analytic calculations, extended its interactive reporting features, and improved the overall platform performance. This release also introduces a new product for advanced embedded analytics: Visualize.js. Continue reading Jaspersoft BI Platform Adds Big Data Capabilities

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