All posts by Mike Kavis

Mike is a VP/Principal Architect for Cloud Technology Partners. Mike has served in numerous technical roles such as CTO, Chief Architect, and VP positions with over 25 years of experience in software development and architecture. A pioneer in cloud computing, Mike led a team that built the world's first high speed transaction network in Amazon's public cloud and won the 2010 AWS Global Startup Challenge. An expert in cloud security, Mike is currently writing a book for Wiley Publishing called "Architecting the Cloud: Design Decisions for Cloud Computing Service Models (IaaS, PaaS, SaaS)" which is expected to be released in late 2013.

AWS re:Invent Keynote: 7 Basic Freedoms

BusinessAgilityAndy Jassy, SVP of AWS, made a ton of new announcements in his keynote speech yesterday at the 4th annual AWS re:Invent conference in Las Vegas. The conference has grown to nearly 20,000 attendees with around 38,000 watching the live streaming event. Continue reading AWS re:Invent Keynote: 7 Basic Freedoms

The Container Security Gap is Rapidly Closing

agilecloudI have been following containers for quite some time now. A year ago it was safe to say that container technologies like Docker were far from production ready when it came to security. What I have seen over the past year is a ton of development towards closing that gap. For this post, I’ll focus on Docker. Continue reading The Container Security Gap is Rapidly Closing

Recap of CloudBees Jenkins User Conference

JenkinsWorldConfI was at the Santa Clara Convention Center, next to the beautiful brand-new San Francisco 49ers stadium, this week to listen to two days of discussions about continuous delivery and Jenkins. Keynote speakers were Kohsuke Kawaguchi, creator of Jenkins and CTO at CloudBees, and Gene Kim, coauthor of The Phoenix Project and well-known speaker on DevOps. Continue reading Recap of CloudBees Jenkins User Conference

Tracking the Hot Container Market

agilecloudThe container market is moving at the speed of light. Each vendor in this space is delivering features at an amazing pace. In fact, things are moving so fast that this article will likely be way outdated in about 2 months. It was just under two months ago when I reported on the many announcements made at DockerCon 2015 in San Francisco. Since then, each vendor has made a number of significant announcements about new features or partnerships. Here is a rundown of what has been announced by the major players in the hot container space. Continue reading Tracking the Hot Container Market

DevOps and Bottlenecks

agilecloudOne of the main goals of DevOps is to streamline the software development lifecycle (SDLC) by removing waste from the system. Waste is often found in the form of bottlenecks, things within the system the slow down forward progress and introduce unnecessary wait time or tasks. This waste can be caused by inefficient processes, technology issues, and organizational or people issues. Successful companies are able to look at the entire value stream to identify the waste and then systematically work on reducing that waste from the SDLC to continuously improve, resulting in better speed to market, improved quality, and higher reliability. Companies the can continuously improve in this fashion become high performing companies which often results in improved customer satisfaction, better productivity, and improved financial results. This is the ultimate dream of the C-level types who are looking to transform their companies with DevOps. Continue reading DevOps and Bottlenecks

Security: Continuous Delivery Requires New Approaches

agilecloudAs companies embrace the DevOps movement, they rely heavily on automation to improve the time to market for new features and services. DevOps is a long, never-ending journey with a goal of continuously improving the software delivery process, resulting in better products and services and, ultimately, happier customers. At the beginning of their DevOps journies, many companies focus on continuous integration (CI), in which they automate the build process. Automated testing is implemented so that builds will fail if any changes fail the baseline tests. The idea here is to never move bugs forward, catching them early in the process.

Continue reading Security: Continuous Delivery Requires New Approaches

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