All posts by Mike Norman

From 2009 to 2014 Dr Mike Norman was the Analyst at The Virtualization Practice for Open Source Cloud Computing. He covered PaaS, IaaS and associated services such as Database as a Service from an open source development and DevOps perspective. He has hands-on experience in many open source cloud technologies, and an extensive background in application lifecycle tooling; automated testing - functional, non-functional and security; digital business and DevOps. in 2014 he moved on to become Cloud Services Architect at JP Morgan Chase.

VMworld 2012: VMware joins OpenStack

VMworld2012150x27In Open Source it’s impossible to keep a secret (and in any case Anti-Trust laws make it very risky). And despite the imminence of VMworld, the governance processes of OpenStack run to their own timetable, so some interesting news about VMWare was made public on Sunday 26th August – the day before VMWorld – that VMware joins OpenStack.

Continue reading VMworld 2012: VMware joins OpenStack

Why You Should Invest in ASaaS, not PaaS

CloudComputingOver the last few months we’ve become fascinated by the Platform as a Service (PaaS) market because after an initial phase where it was dominated by platform-specific and language-specific offerings, a set of Universal PaaS are emerging, many of which are based around the Open Source Cloud Foundry from VMware. In addition to PaaS, there is a class of vendors who provide external services to PaaS through “marketplaces” that the vendor sets up. We refer to these generically as Application Services as a Service (ASaaS). The stakes are potentially huge – the PaaS takes over from the Operating System as the dominant factor in the purchasing decision for server-side technology.  We’re not saying it definitely will happen, but it might.

Continue reading Why You Should Invest in ASaaS, not PaaS

Uhuru – How CloudFoundry learned to stop worrying and love .NET

CloudComputingAt this point in the evolution of PaaS, we are starting to see an enormous diversity of innovation around CloudFoundry, as multiple vendors come to market with differentiated PaaS offerings. Uhuru Software, based in Seattle, is entering its second Beta phase with the Uhuru PaaS, with a major focus on .NET support. Continue reading Uhuru – How CloudFoundry learned to stop worrying and love .NET

VMware and Public Cloud Computing – A Discussion

CloudComputingRumors in the press (CRN – Project Zephyr) have speculated that VMware is about to offer its own cloud has created an email thread among us analysts that we felt was worth sharing. The core issues discussed in the thread are 1) what is VMware going to do about the success of Amazon EC2, OpenStack and CloudStack, 2) what is the relationship between VMware’s success in the enterprise and potential success in a public cloud, and 3) what is the best way for companies to “on-ramp” into the public cloud. This lead to a discussion which started on the point of whether or not vSphere was scalable enough to be a platform for a successful public cloud computing offering. Continue reading VMware and Public Cloud Computing – A Discussion

3rd-Party Application Services – a sign of PaaS maturity

CloudComputingAs mentioned in a number of posts, there is a clear trend away from Platform-specific PaaS (where you write your application to the platform) and Language-Specific PaaS (which provide support to one or possibly a couple of  languages) to Universal PaaS, which is capable of supporting any language and any platform.  There’s a little bit of a gray area, but we would include ActiveState  Stackato,  AppFog, dotCloud, GigaSpaces  Cloudify, Red Hat  OpenShift, Salesforce Heroku, Uhuru Software AppCloud and VMware CloudFoundry in this category. These vendors differentiate themselves by providing a broad range of Application Services or Application Lifecycle Services. Continue reading 3rd-Party Application Services – a sign of PaaS maturity

Azure and Service Providers

CloudComputingBernd Harzog recently wrote about Microsoft’s Three Pronged Windows Azure Strategy – particularly with reference to the Service Provider offering. I’ve now had a certain amount of time to reflect on the announcement and try and work out what is going on and it doesn’t seem to constitute a wholehearted strategy to put resellers on a level playing field with Microsoft. Continue reading Azure and Service Providers

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