All posts by Mike Norman

From 2009 to 2014 Dr Mike Norman was the Analyst at The Virtualization Practice for Open Source Cloud Computing. He covered PaaS, IaaS and associated services such as Database as a Service from an open source development and DevOps perspective. He has hands-on experience in many open source cloud technologies, and an extensive background in application lifecycle tooling; automated testing - functional, non-functional and security; digital business and DevOps. in 2014 he moved on to become Cloud Services Architect at JP Morgan Chase.

Rationalizing the NRE Cloud Alliance – newScale, rPath and Eucalyptus

We’ve been following Eucalyptus for some time, and they recently invited us to a briefing about a new alliance called NRE, which is a credible group of independent vendors, newScale, rPath and Eucalyptus.

This wasn’t spun  from an Open Source prespective and it was interesting to see the Eucalyptus positioning to the general marketplace.  Eucalyptus is positioned as the “leading” Open Source cloud, the benefit of Open Source being it is “on your own terms”.  It offers IAAS in the data center, just like Amazon Web Services.  It is Elastic, based on industry standard APIs, hypervisor agnostic, supports both Windows & Linux guests, and has a huge ecosystem.  It’s the elasticity and the scalability that are driving the adoption. Pricing is secondary, and you also get the feeling that it’s not traditional enterprises which are picking it up. Continue reading Rationalizing the NRE Cloud Alliance – newScale, rPath and Eucalyptus

Ubuntu edging towards OpenStack

Around this time last year we were tracking the development of the Ubuntu Enterprise Cloud, a Eucalyptus-based solution that is bundled into the Ubuntu installation from 9.10  onwards and allows you to install a IaaS cloud into which you subsequently install Ubuntu Server instances, rather than directly installing an Ubuntu Server. The Eucalyptus proposition is that the cloud you create is identical from an API – and therefore a tooling – perspective  to an Amazon EC2 cloud, and the same Ubuntu instances can run inside  it, and even can be cloud-bursted out to it.  Canonical make a lot of this duality in their positioning of Eucalyptus and the Ubuntu Enterprise Cloud. It feels very-much like an “onramp” message that we hear from VMware. Continue reading Ubuntu edging towards OpenStack

Rackspace Hijacks OpenStack

Call me a bore, but Open Source Governance models would be my “Specialist Subject” on a quiz show.  It’s not that I have studied Open Source Governance, it’s more that I have lived it. A s a member of the Board of Directors of Eclipse I worked extensively with both Skip McGaughey who originally set up Eclipse as an entity inside IBM, and with Mike Milinkovich who took it over as an independent entity, and I know the pain that the originating organization has to go through to let go of its baby, and the pain that an independent director goes through to finally wrest the baby from its parent’s grasp, and the benefits to the originating organization and to the community at large when it all happens.  I also know that Rackspace has gone through none of that pain in setting up OpenStack,  it has got the OpenStack governance model spectacularly wrong, and as a result the whole initiative is in peril.

The OpenStack Governance Document bears an uncanny resemblance to George Orwell’s Animal Farm.  You may remember that various animals got together to throw out the humans with the slogan “All Animals are Equal”, but that over time the slogan migrated to “All Animals Are Equal, but some are More Equal than Others” as the Pigs gained control and became indistinguishable from the humans they threw out.  OpenStack was created with a similar sentiment: let’s throw out Eucalyptus and create a community programme where all contributors are equal. What has emerged in the governance model is  “All Contributors are Equal, but Rackspace is more equal than others”.  All the key positions, and a majority on the decision-making bodies are reserved for Rackspace.  Rackspace, like the Pigs in Animal Farm, has subverted the revolution. Continue reading Rackspace Hijacks OpenStack

Will VMware acquire SUSE to build a clone of Microsoft Azure?

Rumors have intensified since our post back in June suggesting VMware might acquire SUSE Linux from Novell as part of a “fire sale” of Novell’s assets. Much of the rationale we articulated has been repeated in posts on other sites.

  • VMware would get, a widely-adopted operating system with great application and tool support.
  • VMware would have a long-term strategy to compete with Microsoft at the Operating System level in case Hyper-V became the dominant hypervisor under Windows.
  • VMware would have the last major layer in its SpringSource platform, now re-named vFabric

However, nobody has picked up on another point we made:

If VMware buys Novell, it can create an entire clone of Microsoft Azure without a single piece of Microsoft software in the stack. Continue reading Will VMware acquire SUSE to build a clone of Microsoft Azure?

VMware positions for the future around vFabric and vCloud

Two of the most significant announcements involved the consolidation of  VMware’s recent acquisitions in the applications platform space into vFabric and the addition of a management offering (vCloud Director) to vCloud which are respectively PaaS and IaaS plays that compete feature-wise with the established market leaders.

vFabric

In VMworld from an Open Source Perspective, we mentioned that in its SpringSource subsidiary, VMware had managed to acquire an entire application stack.  The big VMworld announcement was they’ve given this a name – vFabric.  You can tell it’s a core VMware product – it begins with a small “v”. Continue reading VMware positions for the future around vFabric and vCloud

Intel buys McAfee “for security in the cloud”

In case you missed it, Intel has bought McAfee, a security company best known for virus scanning and other malware detection software, for $7.68Bn (on revenues of about $2Bn).  This is a tidy multiple in any marketplace, particularly as  McAfee is not the dominant player.  It is the largest deal Intel has ever done, and the largest pure-play security deal ever.  Plus the deal was in cash.

Add to this the Intel plan to purchase the Wireless Solution unit of Infineon (for $1.4Bn) and you now have the direction in which Intel plans to go. More Security in the hardware.

The technical rationale behind the deal seems to be that security should be going into hardware, and that in newer cloud access devices (Android, iPad etc) it wont’ be a bolt-on extra like it is at the moment, it’ll be something that OEMs could buy from Intel.  The same argument applies to the clouds themselves.  Servers would come with embedded security. We’ve been discussing this stack/hardware boundary a little at the virtualization practice – it features on our recent podcast, Virtual Thoughts: Is the Hypervisor moving into Hardware?. However, our perception had been that the stack/hardware boundary was being driven by the VCE coalition (VMware, Cisco, EMC) and potentially by HP and even Dell, but not by the semiconductor manufacturers. Continue reading Intel buys McAfee “for security in the cloud”

Google Circle
Join my Circle on Google+

Plugin by Social Author Bio