All posts by Andrew Wood

Andrew is a Director of Gilwood CS Ltd, based in the North East of England, which specialises in delivering and optimising server and application virtualisation solutions. With 12 years of experience in developing architectures that deliver server based computing implementations from small-medium size business to global enterprise solutions, his role involves examining emerging technology trends, vendor strategies, development and integration issues, and management best practices.

Ericom blazes forward with an HTML5 Client for VDI

Ericom Software have announced a number of solutions to allow organisations to deliver VDI access to a wider range of devices. Ericom joined a number of other vendors such as 2x, Citrix and Quest, in offering a free mobile client – AccessToGo – which is available on the iPad, iPhone, iPod Touch and Android tablets and phones. AccessToGo supports RDP and VMware View, but also Ericom’s Blaze RDP accelerator and Ericom’s own PowerTerm WebConnect client.

Perhaps more importantly, Ericom have also announced the general availability of their patent-pending HTML5 client, AccessNow.  AccessNow provides web-based access to a range of  RDP based virtual desktop solutions – be they hosted desktops such as VMware View or session based desktops in Microsoft’s Terminal Services/RDS. Continue reading Ericom blazes forward with an HTML5 Client for VDI

HP embraces AppSense for Reference Architecture

Managing a user’s desktop persona and making it extend across multiple desktop delivery platforms is a key component in any company’s desktop strategy.  User Virtualization describes a category of solutions that capture and manage the end user experience that allows a “follow me” feature of the desktop persona.

In a press release on June 29, 2011 AppSense announced that its User Virtualization Platform is now a core building block of HP’s new Client Virtualization Reference Architecture. Along with Microsoft, VMware and Citrix, AppSense User Virtualization has been recognized by HP as a crucial technology for a successful architecture that meets the goals for client virtualization. Continue reading HP embraces AppSense for Reference Architecture

Virsto gets $12 million boost to help push virtualized storage beyond Hyper-V

Virsto has announced they have secured $12 million in Series B venture capital funding. In addition, Virsto has revealed it has acquired EvoStor, a company specializing in storage virtualization technology for VMware environments.

Virsto developed the first hypervisor-based storage solution built for virtual machines which we’ve spoken about in the past. At present, Virsto’s solution is for Microsoft Hyper-V implementations only. Yet Khaled Nasr, partner at InterWest who joins Virsto’s board of directors, is obviously excited about the prospect of not only expanding Virtso’s potential for Microsoft Hyper-V,  but developing new markets: Continue reading Virsto gets $12 million boost to help push virtualized storage beyond Hyper-V

Citrix Reach Out for the SME market with Kaviza Aquisition

One of the initial announcements at Citrix Synergy was that Kaviza,who developed one of the first all-in-one “VDI-in-a-Box” solutions for small and medium business, have been acquired by Citrix. The acquisition adds a fast-track VDI-only solution to the Citrix portfolio. The Kaviza “VDI-in-a-Box” product is billed as complementing the Citrix’s  XenDesktop product line for enterprise-class desktop virtualization. Continue reading Citrix Reach Out for the SME market with Kaviza Aquisition

Cloud Computing is not Utility Computing

In our previous article “Can the Vendors Eat Their Own Dog Food on Cloud Billing?” we offered a provoking insight on what it is that Cloud Computing is and how it should be billed to you. It was suggested that Cloud Computing was fundamentally about “making IT a utility”.

However is  “Cloud computing” a utility computing? And if it isn’t, what is it?

Continue reading Cloud Computing is not Utility Computing

Cloud SLAs Are Worthless But Does this Matter?

A Service Level Agreement (SLA) is an excellent expectations-managing mechanism, but it’s important to manage your own expectations of what an SLA can realistically accomplish. Just those three words “Service” “Level” and “Agreement” is often an attention turn-off I know: SLAs are to infrastructure bods what documentation is to developers. Yet, when considering taking up cloud and utility services many consider that the SLAs offered aren’t reliable, if they exist at all. So the SLA becomes the blocker – ‘If I move services out of my data centre, how will I guarantee availability and performance’.

Are SLAs for Cloud services really worthless and if they are, will the wider adoption of cloud services be impacted because of this?

Continue reading Cloud SLAs Are Worthless But Does this Matter?

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