VSAN Pricing Comparison

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6 Responses to VSAN Pricing Comparison

  1. March 21, 2014 at 12:00 PM

    == Disclosure – Pure Storage Employee ==

    Tom,

    Thanks for the post. Two questions.

    1. Shouldn’t you have compared usable capacity with the Dell storage and the VSAN? I ask specifically as VSAN requires a minimum of 220% capacity overhead (this is with the minimum data protection of N+1). The SAN likely provides RAID 5 (N+1) and RAID 6 (N+2) options.
    (Note: N+2 data protection is not available with a 3 node VSAN, you would nee a 5 node).

    2. You state that when one expends the capacity of the SAN they would also need to purchase a new vSphere server. Can you elaborate as this statement doesn’t read as accurate. If one adds more VMs they will need to add more servers. Adding capacity to existing VMs means one likely has to add nodes to VSAN before the SAN as the SAN has more usable capacity.

    Thanks for the post.
    -vaughn

  2. Rafael Kabesa
    April 3, 2014 at 6:02 PM

    == Disclosure – VMware Employee ==

    Dear Vaughn,

    We’re flattered you show so much interest in our product. I’m sure most readers can make there own decisions getting the correct information from the people who built VSAN.

    1. Not sure where are you getting 220%?? Yes in case of the need for a VM to obtain a policy of one failure to tolerate you need two copies of the data – but this is done on very low $/GB HDDs – and without the need to understand what RAID-5 or RAID-6 means or to deal with any of the complicated configuration that follows that. We’ll be publishing a real sizing guide soon – I’m sure you’d like to play with it.

    2. Adding capacity can be done by adding disks to the hosts. You won’t need more hosts unless you run out of compute power. SAN has more usable capacity on average, but with just 3 hosts and large 4TB disks you can get as much as 420TB Raw or 210TB usable assuming the above policy- Looks like plenty of space to me – how much does 210TB of usable capacity costs when you buy other storage solutions?

  3. April 4, 2014 at 4:45 AM

    “2. Adding capacity can be done by adding disks to the hosts. You won’t need more hosts unless you run out of compute power. ”

    Aha! How much compute power does VSAN use, especially if I take my R420 node from 4 2.5″ drives to 8 or 16?

    The new storage vendors are leveraging commodity CPU power & SSD to hit the sweet spot when it comes to $$$/U, $$$/TB, and $$$/IOP. Just a for instance, but Pure & Nimble use their CPUs to great effect….in-line de-dupe & compression result in real savings at the cost of red-lined, but single-purposed, storage CPUs.

    ” how much does 210TB of usable capacity costs when you buy other storage solutions?”

    It might be more, but there’s no free lunch here, right?

    In the example above, three node R420 with 4TB drives and 210TB usable, what’s the cost on host compute power? Does adding disk paradoxically subtract from the number of VMs I can run on the same host? If not, I wonder how would that 3 node 210TB system compete with an array purpose built to use an entire CPU?

  4. Wade Holmes
    April 6, 2014 at 6:21 PM

    Jeff,

    **VMware employee here**

    Low CPU utilization is one of the strengths of VSAN, due to the architecture and it being a kernel module. VSAN has been designed to never used more than 10% cpu utilization with real world workloads, even when scaling a server up the maximum of 5 SSDs and 35 HDDs. In our internal testing, VSAN cpu utilization with real workloads is typically around 5%-6%.

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