The Virtualization Practice

Virtualization Management

Virtualization Management covers all aspects of managing a modern virtual or software defined data center. This includes managing across virtualization platforms and clouds, monitoring the performance and availability of the virtualization platforms (hypervisors) and the clouds, monitoring the capacity of the virtualization platforms and clouds, ...
monitoring the performance of the applications running on these platforms and clouds, automatically provisioning these environments, securing these environments, and ensuring that the data in these environments is always protected and available.

Enterprises and mid-sized businesses (SME’s) face two significant challenges and opportunities with respect to the end user desktops in the next two years. The first opportunity and challenge is how to replace the aging Windows XP installed base with the recently released Windows 7 platform. The second is how to end up with a desktop environment that is inherently more flexible and manageable than what is in place today.

EMC/Cisco/VMware vBlock – OpEx Savings Courtesy of Ionix

Prior to the announcement and subsequent to the announcement of Ionix, EMC has been on an absolute tear acquiring companies that have components that will be combined into the new Ionix management stack. These announcements have included the acquisitions of Voyence, ConfigureSoft, Fastsale Technology, and an agreement to resell VMware AppSpeed.

EMC/Cisco/VMware vBlock – an Economist’s Perspective

So from an economists perspective, there is really one and only one simple question. How will the vBlock initiative make earnings per share at EMC, Cisco, and VMware grow faster than they would have had the companies not done this partnership or faster than if they had of done something else with the resources that they are putting into this partnership?

Virtualization – A Feature of the OS, or a New Platform?

Microsoft and Red Hat has just announced that they have completed the certifications of the cross OS hypervisor agreements that the companies originally announced back in February of 2009. This means that Microsoft now certifies Red Hat Linux guests on Hyper-V and Red Hat certifies certain Windows guests on KVM. Red Hat has an excellent article on its web site that details which version of which products work with which and which provides an excellent FAQ.

Eucalyptus is a software stack that when added to a standard virtualized data-center or co-located server network, turns it into a Cloud which looks exactly like the Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2). It is a “self-build” Amazon Cloud kit. Just add hypervisor.

We consider Eucalyptus in the context of cloud to datacenter migrations, and standards for cloud APIs.

VMware vs. Microsoft – Management Stack Strategies

VMware has made it very clear that it views virtualization as the catalyst technology which enables driving complexity and cost out of the data center, and injecting freedom, agility, and choice into the data center. VMware has also made it clear that these benefits from virtualization will only occur if virtualization itself (the hypervisor and the low level hypervisor management tools) are complemented by a layer of management tools that allow applications that are hosted on internal and external clouds to be managing very differently than they have been in the past.

There is a great debate on which hypervisor vendor works with ISVs and which do not. You have a number of ISVs working with VMware that are just now starting to work with Hyper-V. A number of ISVs that are struggling to catch up in the virtualization space. Hypervisor Vendors that are directly competing with ISVs as well as welcoming ISVs. This story is not about any of this, but about how easy is it to launch a new product for each of the hypervisors available with or without help from the hypervisor vendor. In essence, is there enough documentation, community, and code out there to be interpreted as welcoming ISVs.