The Virtualization Practice

Personalization Virtualization

Personalization Virtualization covers isolating the user’s persona, settings, customizations, and data from the environment supporting the user. This is an area of increasing importance as users adopt multiple devices including potentially a desktop, a laptop, a smartphone and a table, and want some consistency in behavior across these devices. ...
This will also be an important area of IT departments who wish to ensure that users get a consistent experience and consistent access to information across devices like computers, tablets and phones, and operating systems like Windows, IOS and Android.

VMware’s Application Management Strategy

With vFabric Application Director, VMware is bringing a whole new level of value – application management including the life-cycle of custom and purchased applications across physical, virtual and cloud based environments to the market and its customers. The willingness to work with application software vendors in the Application Marketplace also represents a ground-breaking change for VMware – a company that had never previously partnered very effectively with other vendors of software.

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User virtualisation is rightly being seen as more than profile management. Applications and data are key to the making a generic desktop a viable workspace. With ProfileUnity FlexApp’s Department Installed Applications Liquidware could be the first to deliver on the dream of a more dynamic application mechanism across enterprise desktop environments.

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Liquidware Labs ProfileUnity 5.0 with FlexApp offers an option for user-installed applications (UIA) technology. This new feature offers VDI users the option to seamlessly install their own applications into any non-persistent Windows environment without affecting master images or underlying systems. We take a look what FlexApp delivers, where it is headed and consider it in the context of Citrix Personal vDisks and AppSense StrataApps

My answer to my computing needs is a very high end Windows 7 desktop, a very low end Windows 7 Netbook and an Android phone. I am and will always be a non-fan of the vertically integrated Apple model. I will probably always pay a price in terms of complexity of my computing life for this bias. But being a free market economist at heart, I like Shrek believe in the value of layers. I believe that processors, system software, device design, operating system design, applications development and content are all separate disciplines with completely separate bases of comparative advantage. I believe that attempts to integrate across these layers in a proprietary and closed way will fail. Windows computers have always outsold Mac’s for this reason. Android phones are already outselling iPhones for this reason. If Microsoft could get its act together on the phone and tablet front, it could restore the natural economic order of the marketplace to the device industry. But that is the subject of another post.

The answer is to dramatically narrow the scope and set of enforcement actions for SOPA and PIPA so that they target just offshore sites engaged in large scale commercial piracy and so that the existing safe harbor for sites that take content from users is both maintained and formally recognized as an exception to the scope of SOPA and PIPA. This will ensure that law enforcement can go after the really bad actors, and that the many good and useful sites and are the basis of the “good Internet” are not collateral damage in these enforcement efforts.