The Virtualization Practice

Performance Management

Performance Management covers monitoring the physical infrastructure, the virtual infrastructure and applications for end-to-end performance and service levels. It covers Application Performance Management, Infrastructure Performance Management, Operations Management, Capacity Planning, and Capacity Management. ...
Environments covered include Virtualization Performance Management, Software Defined Data Center Performance Management, and Cloud Performance Management. Key issues include ensuring the performance of virtualized and cloud based data centers, ensuring the performance of software defined data centers (SDDC performance management), ensuring virtualized application performance, cloud application performance, and SDDC application performance. Key vendors covered include VMware, AppDynamics, AppEnsure, AppFirst, AppNeta, Astute Networks, Aternity, BlueStripe, Boundary, Cirba, CloudPhysics, Correlsense, Compuware, Dell, Embotics, ExtraHop, GigaMon, Hotlink, HP, Intigua, ManageEngine, New Relic, Prelert, Puppet Labs, Riverbed, Splunk, Tintri, Virtual Instruments, Virtustream, VMTurbo, Xangati, and Zenoss.

RUM (also called End User Experience Management) is becoming a critical feature of modern APM solutions. This is being driven by the emergence of rich client platforms like Ajax, Adobe Flash, Adobe Flex, and Microsoft Silverlight as well as the emergence of the iPad and Android based tablets as platforms for client side business applications. These applications development trends when combined with virtualization, IT as a Service and Cloud Computing will make RUM into a critical capability for being able to assess how the end user is doing irrespective of what is happening to the deployment model of the back end application.

In a world where you are changing everything – by moving applications in whole or in part from physical to virtual, to private cloud and ultimately (at least for some applications) to a public cloud, having an external reference point from which to judge the performance of these applications is essential. That reference point might best be the end user’s workstation, laptop or mobile device. Real User Monitoring solutions are likely to play a prominent role here.

Monitoring SQL Server Performance on VMware vSphere

Attempting to infer the performance of a database server by looking at resource utilization metrics will fail technically and organizationally. In a shared and dynamic environment, the only way to truly assess the performance of an element of the infrastructure or an application is to measure how long it is actually taking to do its job. This makes response time and its companion metric latency into the two most important metrics for virtualized and cloud based systems.

Security of Performance and Management tools within the Virtual Environment

The problem is that not everything is as black and white as security folks desire. If we implement performance and other management tools, we often need to expose part of our all important virtualization management network to others. But how do we do this safely, securely, with minimal impact to usability? Why do we need to this is also another question. You just have to take one look at the Virtualization ASsessment TOolkit (Vasto) to realize the importance of this security requirement. But the question still exists, how do you implement other necessary tools within your virtual environment without impacting usability?

VMTurbo has delivered a new free vSphere performance and capacity management solution that is neither time nor size of environment limited, and that breaks new ground in terms of capacity management functionality delivered in a free solution. The automatically generated VM Rightsizing Recommendations should prove to be of particular value to vSphere administrators.

Public Cloud SLA’s are worthless. They need to be replaced by metrics that measure the responsiveness of what the cloud provider owns to the layer of software from the customer running in the cloud. Developing these metrics will require significant changes to existing APM approaches in order to be able to separate time spent in the application from time spent in the application framework or OS.