The Virtualization Practice

IT as a Service

IT as a Service (ITaaS) covers private clouds hybrid clouds and the cloud management offerings used to create and manage these clouds. This includes coverage of Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) private and hybrid cloud offerings, Platform as a Service (PaaS) private and hybrid cloud offerings, and Software as a Service (SaaS). ...
Emerging areas like Desktop as a Service (DaaS), Storage as a Service, and Applications as a Service are also covered. The key issues covered include which enterprise applications and use cases are appropriate for private and hybrid clouds, and how vendors should select the cloud management offerings that are going to be used to manage these various types of cloud services. Covered vendors include VMware (vCloud Automation Center), VirtuStream, CloudBolt Software, Intigua, ElasticBox, ServiceMesh, Cloudsidekick, and Puppet Labs.

SDDC.Management.Stack.Reference.Architecture

The SDDC and the Cloud are going to require a new SDDC Management Stack that will need to be based upon a multi-vendor big data datastore. There will likely be on-premise and cloud hosted version of these datastores. Splunk, VMware, New Relic, The Pivotal Initiative, CloudPhysics, AppNeta, and Boundary are all excellent hypothetical suppliers of such a datastore.

Microsoft100x30

Microsoft has announced that it will offer System Center Advisor for free to its customers in supporting countries. System Center Advisor is a cloud service that enables IT Professionals to proactively avoid problems resulting from server configuration issues. It can help you resolve issues faster by providing access to current and historical configuration data for a deployment. System Center Advisor can also assist in reducing downtime by providing suggestions for improvement and notifying users of key updates specific to their configuration

CloudComputing

Taking your cloud from a dev/test/pilot/training use case to a platform for business critical enterprise applications introduces significant new requirements that first generation cloud management platforms were not designed to meet. Elasticity and self-service are nice features, but these features alone fall far short of what is needed to provision and run enterprise applications in clouds.