The Virtualization Practice

Desktop Virtualization

Desktop Virtualization covers VDI (centrally hosted desktops), Desktops as a Service (DaaS), desktop virtualization via client side hypervisors, and shared server technologies. Major areas of focus include when and where centralized desktop offerings are appropriate and not appropriate, ...
how management of remote desktops combined with management of mobile devices leads to a better managed and more productive end user computing environment, how to deliver the performance that end users require, and the impacts of using remote desktop technologies upon organizational security. Covered products and vendors include the VMware Horizon Suite, Horizon View, Horizon Mirage, VMware ThinApp, Citrix XenServer, Citrix XenApp, Citrix XenClient, and Microsoft Remote Data Services.

DesktopVirtualization

In a surprise move, hyperconverged systems startup NIMBOXX has acquired Virtual Bridges’ VERDE VDI platform. NIMBOXX has received some early acclaim for its MeshOS™ hyperconverged appliance. This appliance takes a “simpler is better” approach to converged infrastructure platforms. NIMBOXX claims that customers can be up and running in as little as seven minutes after powering on…

DesktopVirtualization

With half of the first quarter of 2015 already behind us, many IT organizations are in fast-forward mode, making progress on addressing annual projects and goals, including many that involve virtualization. With the plethora of new products and services available, how many of those virtualization projects are based on shifting gears to new vendors or…

citrix100x30

Citrix shocked many this week with its announcement of 900 job cuts, 700 of which were full-time employees and 200 contractors. Although quota sales positions will be less impacted than other departments, the overall 10% reduction throughout the company will no doubt impact engineering, product management, support, and other technical groups upon which architects, administrators,…

ApplicationVirtualization

Java is currently the leading exploit vector for Windows machines, and Java vulnerabilities are packaged into many of the “exploit kits” available in the darker corners of the Internet (see http://krebsonsecurity.com/2010/10/java-a-gift-to-exploit-pack-makers/). Internet Explorer, Flash Player, and even the Windows operating system itself have done a good job of either improving the security of their products or…