The Virtualization Practice

Data Center Virtualization

Data Center Virtualization covers virtualizing servers, networks, and storage delivering server consolidation, CAPEX savings, IT agility, and improved management. Major areas of focus include the tradeoffs between various virtualization platforms (VMware vSphere, Microsoft Hyper-V and Red Hat KVM), the evolution of hypervisors into data center management platforms, ...
VMware’s Software Defined Data Center strategy, and how the SDDC is spurring innovation in storage, networking and server hardware. Covered vendors indlude VMware, Microsoft, Red Hat, CloudPhysics, Hotlink, Tintri, and VMTurbo.

DesktopVirtualization

In March 2013, Citrix announced they had GPU sharing working and available for XenApp (multi-user/RDS). In December 2013, they announced it was available for XenDesktop (multi-OS/VDI). This has been a major barrier to adoption for many companies that need the ability to deliver a high-end multimedia experience to their end users in order to gain…

Franken-Monitorsmall

In Beware of the Franken-Monitor, we explained how many enterprises ended up with Franken-Monitors and the dangers associated with assuming that the present state of management tools can make the transition into the software-defined data center (SDDC) and the cloud. In Getting Rid of Your Franken-Monitor, we explained how to use green-field islands to put in place new ecosystem-based management stacks with the intent of eventually retiring your legacy management stacks. In this post, we detail how one could deploy one example of such an ecosystem of tools based upon Splunk and the vendors that comprise its ecosystem.

DataCenterVirtualization

Many network virtualization products appear to be aimed at the top 10,000 customers worldwide, accounting for their price as well as their published product direction. While this is a limited and myopic view, many claim it is for the best, their reason being that network virtualization is only really needed by the very large networks. The more I think about this approach, the more I believe it is incorrect. Let us be frank here. Most networking today, within many different organizational sizes, is a hodgepodge of technologies designed to solve the same problem(s) over and over: how to get data quickly from point A to point B with minimum disruption to service.