The Virtualization Practice

Data Center Virtualization

Data Center Virtualization covers virtualizing servers, networks, and storage delivering server consolidation, CAPEX savings, IT agility, and improved management. Major areas of focus include the tradeoffs between various virtualization platforms (VMware vSphere, Microsoft Hyper-V and Red Hat KVM), the evolution of hypervisors into data center management platforms, ...
VMware’s Software Defined Data Center strategy, and how the SDDC is spurring innovation in storage, networking and server hardware. Covered vendors indlude VMware, Microsoft, Red Hat, CloudPhysics, Hotlink, Tintri, and VMTurbo.

Today (see below) CA announced that it is acquiring NetQos. The combination of the previously acquired Cassatt and Wily assets with the NetQos assets now give CA the full set of components needed to field a comprehensive performance management solution for virtual and cloud environments. The only question that remains is whether or not CA will be able to effectively position and sell these solutions into the virtualization marketplace against experience competitors like VizionCore and Veeam who have signficant channel and customer presence in this market.

The Linux Kernel Virtual Machine (KVM) has been available for some time in, for example, Ubuntu 8.0.4 LTS (Released April 2008). KVM is widely used and stable and it is high time that Red Hat who acquired KVM when they purchased Qumranet in September 2008, started to move their customers onto it – at least to remove the uncertainty in the customer base.

Is VMware trying to remake itself? To Compete with Microsoft?

With all the rebranding going on with VMware, I find it interesting that the new logo for VMware is similar to Microsoft’s logo. A single name instead of the cool boxes they used to have. Did VMware’s brand loose its focus while we were not watching? Is this why VMware is rebranding everthing? Is VMware really trying to remake itself to be more like Microsoft?

Veeam, Vizioncore, and PhD Virtual all showed there latest released products as well as the future products that integrate with VMware vSphere at much deeper levels that previously available, ala the VMware vStorage API. Talk was also about expanding their products into Microsoft Hyper-V as well as Citrix XenServer. This space has become so important that even the traditional backup vendors such as Symantec (BackupExec) as well as HP (DataProtector) are getting into the act. This shows ecosystem as well as market maturity not seen at last years VMworld.

When VMware acquired SpringSource it also gained an OSGi runtime known as SpringSource dm Server, to which developers can directly build applications using the Spring and other development toolsets without the use of a J2EE application Server such as WebSphere or Tomcat (which is integrated into SpringSource dm Server for backwards compatibility. It is not entirely fanciful that the OSGi Runtime could, in due course, be made to run directly on the hypervisor, removing the requirement for a Guest O/S, leaving a complete VMware Enterprise Java stack.

Akorri, a leader in virtual infrastructure performance and capacity management for the dynamic data center, today announced the availability of BalancePoint 3.0 – the latest version of the company’s award-winning virtual infrastructure management software. BalancePoint 3.0 allows IT organizations to optimize virtual and physical server and storage infrastructure resources to reduce costs. As companies advance through the stages of server virtualization adoption, they need an infrastructure-wide analytical systems management solution like BalancePoint that provides visibility and control to troubleshoot and assure performance, plan server and storage capacity, and manage service levels.