The Virtualization Practice

Cloud Computing

Cloud Computing focuses upon how to construct, secure, manage, monitor and use public IaaS, PaaS, and SaaS clouds. Major areas of focus include barriers to cloud adoption, progress on the part of cloud vendors in removing those barriers, where the line of responsibility is drawn between the cloud vendor and the customer for each of IaaS, PaaS and SaaS clouds, ...
as well as the management tools that are essential to deploy in the cloud, ensure security in the cloud and ensure the performance of applications running in the cloud. Covered vendors include Amazon, VMware, AFORE, CloudSidekick, CloudPhysics, ElasticBox, Hotlink, New Relic, Prelert, Puppet Labs and Virtustream.

CloudComputing

On the 11/1 Virtualization Security podcast we had no special guest but continued a conversation started at Hacker Halted this year. It is the ongoing question of whether or not Going to the cloud will cause jobs to be lost. The typical answer was stated at Hacker Halted, that people will need to cross-train with new products, etc. and then they would keep their jobs, but someone stood up and shouted out that this was hogwash. It made a lively discussion from there. So we tackled it on the podcast as well. Will people loose jobs Going to the Cloud? If so how can this be prevented? What do you as IT professionals need to do, to plan your careers while going to the cloud?

IaaSSec

On many a Virtualization Security Podcast I tend to mention that we need greater visibility into the cloud to judge whether Cloud Service Provider security measures are good enough. But why should we bother? I am not saying we should not be concerned about a cloud’s security but that we should as tenants be concerned with clouds meeting our security, compliance, and data protection policies and requirements. Will a cloud service provider ever be able to meet a specific organizations requirements as well as the cloud service providers policies and compliance?

VirtualizationManagementIcon

VMware has updated its Cloud Management offerings with vCenter Operations 5.6, vCloud Automation Center, vCloud Connector Advanced 2.0, vFabric Application Director 5.0, vFabric APM 5.0, ITBM 7.5 and an IT Benchmarking Service. These are now cross platform offerings spanning multiple hypervisors (vSphere, Xen, KVM), multiple clouds (vCloud, Amazon, Windows Azure), and including support for physical hardware (VCE, IBM, HP, Dell).

CloudComputing

VMware is clearly pursuing a “waterfall” strategy with the editions of the suite. This means that leading edge functionality will most often show up first in the Enterprise Edition of the vCloud Suite and then over time migrate down into the Advanced and Standard Editions. This will set up a battle royal of suite vs best of breed for each of the components of the suite – with each battle focused upon both functionality and pricing differences.

PerformanceManagement

Bundling the Foundation Edition of vCenter Operations into every edition of vSphere is VMware’s strategy for seeding its customer base with just enough of vC OPS to entice customers to move up and purchase a higher level edition of the suite. However, the least expensive version of vCenter Operation is now $125 per VM instead of $50 per VM. Finally support has been added for monitoring OS instances that run on other hypervisors and other clouds.

CloudComputing

With this set of announcements, VMware has proven its intentions of joining the ranks of the major cloud management software vendors. Virtualization and cloud computing represent disruptions that create an opportunity for a new multi-billion dollar management vendor at the table. VMware has announced a suite of management functionality that makes it a credible vendor at this table. Legacy vendors of management solutions like IBM, CA, BMC and HP are now served notice that their businesses and customer footprints are at risk. Game on.