The Virtualization Practice

Cloud Computing

Cloud Computing focuses upon how to construct, secure, manage, monitor and use public IaaS, PaaS, and SaaS clouds. Major areas of focus include barriers to cloud adoption, progress on the part of cloud vendors in removing those barriers, where the line of responsibility is drawn between the cloud vendor and the customer for each of IaaS, PaaS and SaaS clouds, ...
as well as the management tools that are essential to deploy in the cloud, ensure security in the cloud and ensure the performance of applications running in the cloud. Covered vendors include Amazon, VMware, AFORE, CloudSidekick, CloudPhysics, ElasticBox, Hotlink, New Relic, Prelert, Puppet Labs and Virtustream.

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Through a variety of initiatives including the Insime spin-in and the acquisition of Cloupia, Cisco is signalling that it is heading in the direction of becoming a management software vendor for virtualization and the cloud. This amounts a sharpening of the competitive knives with respect to VMware, and may position Cisco to become a factor in the disruption of the legacy management software businesses of IBM, BMC, HP and CA.

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At a dinner party recently, I was asked “does information want to be free?” This question is based on information that exists within the cloud today or tomorrow: Data in the Cloud. It is an interesting question with a fairly ready answer. Information is Power, it is people not information that controls information. Granted we have a massive abundance of information within the cloud today, is it trying to be free, or are people trying to make it free to everyone? In addition, is all this information even true or accurate?

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Moving to the cloud! Let me be a little more precise and say moving to the public cloud. This concept has really been embraced and thrives in the consumer area but will this concept really take off in the corporate world and really should it? One of the main concepts of virtualization, in the beginning, was the ability to consolidate physical systems into a virtual environment to shrink the overall foot print size as well as being able to take advantage and use all available compute resources available in a physical server and having centralized control of the compute, storage and networking resources.

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Brocade has stated they will buy Vyatta for an all cash deal. This is good news for Vyatta and perhaps a way for Brocade to partake of software that could rival VMware’s purchase of Nicira when Vyatta’s own SDN features are married with Brocade Ether Fabric technology. Brocade has been in the software business for a while now, but only with respect to their own hardware. With Vyatta, they will shortly own a building block to allow Ether Fabric to extend into the virtual and cloud environments. It would be short sighted to say this is just an SDN play, this purchase shows there is quite a bit of benefit to Brocade.