The Virtualization Practice

Tag Archive for vCloud

CloudComputing

Have you taken any time to so who run what hypervisor? Is it just me or does there seem to be a lot of articles and post about Open Stack recently that it would almost seem like everything is running on Open Stack? Seems to be that there seems to be a push to help keep Open Stack on the path to becoming more mainstream and the new partnership with Red Hat building might be just the ticket. For now, Open Stack is still going through its adolescence but has great potential to go out and really make a difference in this world. Until then, have you ever stopped to consider and look at what underlying hypervisor is supporting the clouds we all know and love?

DataCenterVirtualization

Working with LDAP and Microsoft Active Directory: For most IT professionals, there has been some point in their career where they have connected a product or service to a Microsoft Active Directory with LDAP for authentication. This is really nothing new and has been done for years, but I discovered a different way to set up the connections years ago when I was working on a script that would connect to Active Directory with an LDAP call to get a list of members of a group. I really thought most people already knew this and it was pretty much common knowledge, but it seems lately that every time I work with someone new setting up the LDAP configuration they seem to be quite surprised at the way I do things and I thought this should be something that I share out.

CloudComputing

My thoughts on the VMware vCloud Hybrid Service: There was an announcement made last week about the new VMware vCloud Hybrid Service which will bring VMware Public Cloud Service to the masses later this year. There are a couple of posts from our own Virtualization Practice analysts which can be found here and here. Since there has been plenty of conversation about just what the vCloud Hybrid Service is, I am going to use this post to share my thoughts on the service itself.

VMware100x30

On Tuesday VMware announced their answer to the public cloud: the vCloud Hybrid Service (vCHS). One of the biggest hurdles for the roughly 500,000 VMware customers has been that their on-premise, private infrastructure isn’t directly interoperable with any sizable public clouds, like Amazon AWS or RackSpace. If you want to move towards a public or hybrid cloud model you need to add additional software, like Enstratius’ offerings or VMware’s own vCloud Automation Center.

DataCenterVirtualization

I was going to write about how building a cloud is similar to moving, but the more I think about it, the more I think people are confusing an automated virtual environment with a cloud: IT as a Service is not just about cloud. Having automation does not imply your virtual environment is a cloud or visa versa. Granted, using IT as a Service is important for a cloud if you look at the NIST definition of a cloud, but it is not necessary for a cloud. Perhaps IT as a Service is just a stepping stone towards a cloud, perhaps it should start as a data center play?

DataCenterVirtualization

Is it possible to use a Cloud Framework to better secure your datacenter? Does cloud technologies provide a secure framework for building more than just clouds? We all know that virtualization is a building block to the cloud, but there may be a way to use cloud frameworks to first secure your datacenter before you launch a private, public, or hybrid cloud. In essence, we can use tools like vCloud Director to provide a more secure environment that properly segregates trustzones from one another while allowing specific accesses.

DataCenterVirtualization

One of the companies and technology to watch is Hotlink with its Cross Platform Management Technology (winner of Best of Show, VMworld 2012). If you have not heard of this before I think you will in the near future. This technology allows you to use VMware’s vCenter Server to manage and control all major hypervisors and public clouds to include VMware vSphere, Microsoft Hyper-V, Citrix XenServer, Red Hat Enterprise Linux (KVM), CloudStack, and Amazon EC2 all from within VMware vCenter.

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