The Virtualization Practice

Tag Archive for CloudFoundry

VMware’s “Squeeze the OS” Strategy – Open War with Microsoft and Red Hat

The announcement of CloudFoundry means the public declaration of full on war between VMware, and the two traditional OS vendors, Microsoft and Red Hat. Both traditional (not quite legacy yet) OS vendors are going to have to rapidly bolster their own PaaS cloud offerings. This will be a particular challenge for Microsoft as Microsoft has always gravitated strongly towards having a tightly integrated stack of software, and not being very open to open source frameworks like Spring, Ruby, and PHP.

VMware’s CloudFoundry and Red Hat’s OpenShift – Compare and Contrast

Over the last few weeks, VMware (as we indicated in an earlier post) and Red Hat have initiated two very similar initiatives known respectively as CloudFoundry and OpenShift. These are Platform as a Service (PaaS) plays, being developed for the longer term, primarily looking to encourage the development of (and thereafter to provide infrastructure for) applications specificallysuited to the the cloud. In this article we compare and contrast the two offerings and discuss their significance for the PaaS market as a whole.

When CloudFoundry was announced, my first thought was this is a nightmare waiting to happen. Why do I think this, because I was not thinking about Open Source developers but enterprise developers and the biggest issue with enterprise development is that the data used by developers is either made up data, but more often than not is actual production data. So the question becomes how can such data be protected when using PaaS public clouds?

VMware’s latest effort, CloudFoundry, is not about VMware delving into the PaaS market even deeper. They have done that already with VMforce. CloudFoundry on the other hand is a fairly astute move to enable the development and rapid adoption of cloud based applications. The end goal is to sell what makes up a PaaS environment which is more enabling software. This would enable enterprises and businesses to move to the cloud. The problem with them moving now is that there are not that many applications that are cloud friendly. In effect more concentration on the application and less on the operating system which has always been VMware’s strategic direction.