The Virtualization Practice

Tag Archive for Cloud Performance Management

What is Going to Replace the Legacy Management Frameworks?

Management frameworks are dead because they have been unable to keep up with the pace of innovation in the enterprise computing industry. Management frameworks will be replaced by ecosystems of cooperating vendors that each reuse each other’s unique data through a common big data back end. Splunk is the first (but not the last) vendor to offer such a back end and to pursue such an ecosystem strategy.

Cloud Performance – Learning from SalesForce.com

The focus upon sharing real response time and transaction load data by SalesForce.com is notable when compared with the pre-historic approach to performance that is used by many cloud vendors (and for a matter of fact many enterprise IT organizations). Response Time correlates directly to end user experience and at the end of the day that is all that matters. Hopefully the industry will learn from SalesForce.com and advance this concept further.

Public Cloud SLA’s are worthless. They need to be replaced by metrics that measure the responsiveness of what the cloud provider owns to the layer of software from the customer running in the cloud. Developing these metrics will require significant changes to existing APM approaches in order to be able to separate time spent in the application from time spent in the application framework or OS.

Virtualization Performance and Capacity Management spans Configuration Management, Resource and Availability Management, Infrastructure Performance Management, Applications Performance Management, and Service Assurance. A broad range of solutions in these areas exist from third party vendors as well as from virtualization platform vendors like VMware. Correctly choosing these solutions is essential for organizations that wish to virtualize business critical applications and guarantee the performance of both the virtual infrastructure and the applications.

Systems Management Frameworks have provided an indispensable function to enterprises with large and business critical networks and data centers. However, frameworks have become a category of expensive and slow to innovate legacy software leading many enterprises to conclude that they must move beyond these products in order to properly monitor their newest environments including those that are based on virtualization and public clouds. New virtualization and cloud focused tools are providing support for these environments that is not present in legacy management frameworks. Self-learning analytics may replace the frameworks as the “manager of managers” or new frameworks may emerge out of the open source movement.