The Virtualization Practice

Tag Archive for Citrix

Today Citrix announced the release of XenDesktop 4, their next generation Virtual Desktop solution with the promise of being able to deliver a right sized desktop to any user in an organization. Along with 70 enhancements and new features, Citrix is positioning XenDesktop as the most flexible and open architecture solution supporting all types of client devices and hypervisors including Citrix XenServer, Microsoft Hyper-V, VMware ESX and vSphere.

Akamai Technologies, Inc. announce the industry’s first managed Internet service for optimizing delivery of virtualized applications and desktops. Based on Akamai’s IP Application Accelerator solution this new service is designed to help enterprises realize the cost efficiency, scalability and global reach inherent with the Internet to deliver VDI solutions offered by companies such as Citrix, Microsoft, and VMware.

In the fog of the datacenter virtualization war, it is difficult to see clearly who will end up on top, and yet the outcome is almost certainly determined, and the victorious generals are even now moving on to fight new battles. Here at the Virtualization Practice we too would like to think we can see through the fog to work out who has won, so here are our thoughts, take account of them as you wish. They concern, primarily, the big four protagonists: Microsoft/Hyper-V, Citrix /Xen, VMware/vSphere and Red Hat/KVM.

In trying to re-use some old server hardware I re-vsisted VirtualBox/Ubuntu, a viable and completely free Open Source option for non-virtualization-enabled hardware. It is a neat solution, simple and well-supported, but the open source version of VirtualBox is nobbled to make it extremely awkward to use, in a different way to VMware’s nobbling of the non-Open Source (but also free) ESXi.

Now is the time, for Oracle/Sun to put all the features of VirtualBox into the Open Source version, and let it live on, perhaps not for use on Linux servers, but as free virtualization platform for other operating systems on Windows. If Apple ever loosens up the licencing on MacOS, it could turn 15 million PCs into Macs – overnight.

The Microsoft TS CAL has become the Microsoft RDS CAL. The change is not only in name, but in functionality and price. The most important new offering is the inclusion of an App-V license. This will make introducing Application Virtualization in Presentation Server more cost effective and may also impact on the choice of Application Virutalization for the desktop.

Citrix’s release of the new Dazzle TechPreview “puts the personal back into computing”. Dazzle is said to make self-service IT a reality, giving users simple access to apps and IT services, in order to bring the economics of the web to enterprise IT

But, is such service really what Citrix should be focusing development time on, would such a service give business benefit, and can Dazzle be utilised in an Enterprise Architecture?