The Virtualization Practice

Tag Archive for AWS

CloudComputing

Have you taken any time to so who run what hypervisor? Is it just me or does there seem to be a lot of articles and post about Open Stack recently that it would almost seem like everything is running on Open Stack? Seems to be that there seems to be a push to help keep Open Stack on the path to becoming more mainstream and the new partnership with Red Hat building might be just the ticket. For now, Open Stack is still going through its adolescence but has great potential to go out and really make a difference in this world. Until then, have you ever stopped to consider and look at what underlying hypervisor is supporting the clouds we all know and love?

re-invent

This week, Amazon Web Services (AWS) held its second annual re:Invent conference. For the past two days, Amazon has been announcing a wide variety of feature enhancements to existing services as well as publicizing new services. Even before these announcements, AWS was so far ahead of their competition in features, customers, and rate of innovation that comparing competitors’ offerings to AWS was almost comical.

The Many Faces of PaaS

By now, enterprises understand the value of Software as a Service (SaaS) and Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS), but there still is much confusion about Platform as a Service (PaaS). This confusion is one reason why enterprises have been slow to adopt PaaS. Why is there so much confusion? Because PaaS is still in its early days of maturity, but it is growing up really quickly right before our eyes.

Agile Cloud Development

Over the last few years there has been an increase in the number of database as a service (DBaaS) offerings that have entered the market place. IaaS providers like Amazon have released solutions such as RDS that automates database administration tasks in the area of scaling, replication, failover, backups, and more. There are a number of companies offering automation around NoSQL databases like Hadoop, MongoDB, Redis, Memcache, and numerous other database technologies.

CloudComputing

On June 26th,Red Hat announced a new version of OpenShift, and pricing for a future production offering (some time this year). You still can’t buy it but if you were able to buy it you’d know exactly how much it could cost – at least if you could work out what a “gear” is. Pricing allows us to start to compare it more meaningfully with other offerings. However rather than comparing with another PaaS offering, we think most people will be actually considering IaaS as an alternative, so we are going to do that comparison instead.