The Virtualization Practice

Tag Archive for Amazon EC2

DataCenterVirtualization

One of the companies and technology to watch is Hotlink with its Cross Platform Management Technology (winner of Best of Show, VMworld 2012). If you have not heard of this before I think you will in the near future. This technology allows you to use VMware’s vCenter Server to manage and control all major hypervisors and public clouds to include VMware vSphere, Microsoft Hyper-V, Citrix XenServer, Red Hat Enterprise Linux (KVM), CloudStack, and Amazon EC2 all from within VMware vCenter.

Microsoft has thrown down the gauntlet right at the feet of Amazon and VMware. With this release Microsoft is bringing to the table its historical strengths in Windows, its on premise position with Windows systems and Windows applications, its ability to operate scale out data centers on a global basis, with a huge commitment to openness and heterogeneity.

Cloudyn Addresses the Economics of Public Cloud Computing

Cloudyn has delivered a breakthrough SaaS delivered service that does for the first time what no one else has done before. The new Cloudyn service actually tells you how to change your image provisioning and your price plans at Amazon so that you can achieve the results that you want at the lowest possible cost. This is the first time that someone has addressed the economics of public cloud computing in this manner. Ultimately this will lead to dramatically higher usage of public cloud services (as their price/performance can now be managed), and will put pressure on internal IT organizations to provide the same kind of data and management options to their internal constituents.

Public Cloud SLA’s are worthless. They need to be replaced by metrics that measure the responsiveness of what the cloud provider owns to the layer of software from the customer running in the cloud. Developing these metrics will require significant changes to existing APM approaches in order to be able to separate time spent in the application from time spent in the application framework or OS.

Given that vSphere provides significant benefits in terms of cost savings and business agility, those benefits are tied to and constrained by the ability of vSphere to provide backward compatibility with existing legacy enterprise systems. This backward compatibility makes it impossible for vSphere to provide infinite horizontal scalability. Moving to the same architecture as the most highly scaled out public cloud vendors provides for a more radical set of benefits, but at the cost of breaking backward compatibility for many applications.