The Virtualization Practice

1060 search results for "vmware"

Virtustream

xStream Enterprise Cloud xStream is Virtustream’s secure, high-performance, enterprise class  cloud computing platform, based on a unique Virtustream µVMTM technology. xStream supports multiple hypervisors, enables granular billing and chargeback, and, thanks to µVMs, is up to 30% more efficient than traditional virtualization. xStream increases operational efficiency and ROI, and offers greater financial flexibility through consumption-based pricing.…

DataCenterVirtualization

Both Microsoft and VMware have revamped their product suites and therefore their licensing once more and how you buy will dictate how you license (as always). It has taken a bit of time for all the information to percolate through to each corporate site and all the issues to be addressed. As we did before, let us look at licensing. We will look at first the old model of Hyper-V vs VMware vSphere vs Citrix Xen vs RedHat KVM. Then in a follow-on article we will look at the new cloud suite models.

Intigua

Intigua virtualizes the management layer, bringing cloud-grade scalability and agility to infrastructure monitoring and management for the first time. Winner of the “Best of VMworld 2012 Gold Award” for New Technology, Intigua enables enterprises to ensure the performance, availability and security of critical applications running on physical, virtual and hybrid cloud infrastructures. Intigua Overview How…

DesktopVirtualization

The software defined data center promised to run all current and future workloads on commodity hardware. However, VDI currently requires unique hardware to perform at scale—a need met by a set of vendors like Astute Networks, Tintri, Nutanix, Pivot3, and V3. VMware is also addressing the unique requirements of VDI adoption in the VMware View Rapid Desktop Program. Therefore VDI currently constitutes an exception to the every workload promise made by the SDDC.

VirtualizationBackup

There is an ever increasing number of data protection providers creating replication receiver clouds as they team up with cloud service providers. This could herald the end of on premise tape use for some enterprises, leaving tape to be used primarily by cloud providers. There are major benefits for Quantum, Zerto, Veeam, and others to form replication receiver clouds, but these clouds are not just or storage anymore. They could be purely for storage, but this is not a big win for the cloud service providers. So why would cloud service providers be interested in being a storage endpoint for data protection? Why are they concerned with backup and offering it as a service?

Agile Cloud Development

The question of whether there is a specific cloud programming language has emerged in our internal discussions at TVP. We’ve noticed a tendency amongst “born in the cloud” companies like Cloud Physics to follow the example of Twitter and develop server-side components in the Scala programming language. Scala runs on the JVM and is supported by a significant number of PaaS, including CloudFoundry. Does this mean that enterprises moving to PaaS should now be coding in Scala?