The Virtualization Practice

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VMware – A Train with an Engine, 3 Boxcars, and a Caboose

VMware is already the most important, and with vSphere the best systems software vendor on the planet. This is true not only based upon the current success of the vSphere platform, but the quality of the long term strategies in place for vFabric, vCloud, and vCenter. With vSphere 5, VMware can ill afford distractions that detract from the momentum of the attack upon the remaining 60% that is not virtualized. The strategic investments in vFabric, vCloud, and vCenter then call into question of viability of having a desktop virtualization business (View) that is today in product and tomorrow in vision a minor subset of what Citrix is delivering and articulating.

The single most dangerous part of this new pricing (to VMware) is rooted in the following fact. What is left to virtualize is very different from what has been virtualized to date. If what VMware has done is change its licensing around to replace one metric (cores) with another (vRAM) in a manner that would have allowed it to get the same revenue from its existing customers to date, then VMware has totally missed the boat.

Licensing:  Pools and Architecture Changes?

In the past, virtualization architects and administrators were told the best way forward is to buy as much fast memory as they could afford as well as standardize on one set of boxes with as many CPUs as they dare use. With vRAM Pool licensing this type of open-ended RAM architecture will change as now I have to consider vRAM pools when I architect new cloud and virtual environments. So let’s look at this from existing virtual environments and then onto new virtual and cloud environments. How much a change will this be to how I architect things today, and how much of a change is there to my existing virtual environments? Is it a better decision to stay at vSphere 4? Or to switch hypervisors entirely?

Ericom blazes forward with an HTML5 Client for VDI

Ericom AccessNow is the first HTML5 client for Microsoft RDP/VMware View. An HTML5 offers the option of organisations delivering access to services not only from personal devices, or kiosk terminals, but from the growing range of devices that have a browser as their core OS such as the Chromebook. At the moment, this is a freely available resource – I’d recommend a look.

The 6/30 Virtualization Security Podcast with Simon Crosby Founder and CEO of Bromium started with a discussion of SaaS security but soon went to a discussion of Data Security. Simon left Citrix not to long ago to form a new company, Bromium, to seriously look into how the hypervisor itself can provide better security for data manipulations than it does today. But first we started off with SaaS and how you can Identify the user within a cloud.

In a press release on June 29, 2011 AppSense announced that its User Virtualization Platform is now a core building block of HP’s new Client Virtualization Reference Architecture. Along with Microsoft, VMware and Citrix, AppSense User Virtualization has been recognized by HP as a crucial technology for a successful architecture that meets the goals for client virtualization.