The Virtualization Practice

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VMware has said that is it committed to its Desktop Virtualization Strategy but VMWare’s commitment to VDI as the only solution is going to mean that unless you are only going to deploy VDI you’ll likely consider another vendor to help you achieve your goal.
There are two desires which are fundamentally in conflict, and addressing this conflict is the biggest opportunity in desktop computing. Can you manage the demand for users to have effective IT at their fingertips while controlling access and costs from the centre?

With VMworld around the corner, it is interesting to note the new an old players within the Virtualization Backup space. The virtualization backup space often includes:

* VM Backup
* VM Replication
* Continuous Data Protection (CDP)
* Storage Hardware Replication

Pretty much anything that will maintain your VMs while allowing your data to be placed elsewhere for later retrieval; such a place could be the cloud. In this article we will avoid Storage Hardware Replication and discuss only backup software.

Is the lack of Client Hypervisor (CHv) a problem for VMware in delivering a complete desktop solution to customers especially in the light of the XenClient release announcement? Indeed, is a client side hypervisor, technology viable for business use now, where should a CHv be considered in your desktop strategy? Is it simply a BYOC solution? Centralising desktop services is not just about delivering a hosted virtual desktop infrastructure. Managing and maintaining the end devices is equally important. CHv is a technology that is viable for business uses now beyond BYOC to match an ever more mobile

VMworld is clearly the largest dedicated virtualization conference, and yet from an Open Source perspective it is slightly disappointing because the VMware ecosystem naturally attracts proprietary software vendors, and also some of the more interesting activities in Open Source are through multi-vendor foundations which do not have the same marketing budgets as vendors themselves.

Nevertheless, there are a number of key Open Source players, and some interesting smaller players, represented at VMworld.

The Virtualization Practice’s Presentation Virtualization Comparison Whitepaper discusses PV in relation to business’ application and desktop delivery needs. This updated release adds Aqua Connect’s Terminal Services for Mac Series 3 to those products from Citrix Xenapp, Ericom’s PowerTerm WebConnect RemoteView, Geniut’s ThinWorx, GraphOn’s Go-Global, Microsoft’s Remote Desktop Services, Propalms’ TSE, Quest’s vWorkspace, Systancia’s AppliDis Fusion and 2x ApplicationServer.

The combination of Quest, Vizioncore and Surgient creates a company that for the first time has all of the management pieces required for an enterprise to be able to virtualize tier one applications and to automate the process of assuring service levels for these applications. This puts Quest in position to be a clear leader in the virtualization management market.

Virtualizing Business Critical Applications – A Reference Architecture

Virtualization Security, Configuration Management, Service and Capacity Management, Provisioning and Lifecycle Management, and Backup/Recovery are essential functions that must be added to a virtualization platform when virtualizing business critical applications. VMware vSphere is clearly the market leading and most robust virtualization platform – and clearly the virtualization platform most suitable as the foundation of a virtualization system designed to support business critical applications. However, the virtualization platform must be complemented with third party solutions in these areas in order to create a system that can truly support business critical applications in an effective manner.