The Virtualization Practice

Bringing a Virtual Host to its Knees

I recently got called to examine some performance issues that were happening to a VMware VDI Cluster. I was told all the hosts in the cluster would run at 100% CPU utilization for an extended period of time and the client would like an explanation and recommendation. I pretty much had a good idea what the problem was before I ever started looking at hosts. I know this topic has been covered many times before but it does not seem like it has been covered enough.

VMware + Ionix Assets – Impact Upon the Configuration Management Ecosystem

This obviously brings to mind the impact that these new product assets has upon VMware’s existing ecosystem of virtualization management and performance management vendors. VMware has a very rich set of vendors that produce value added products for the VMware environment and it is a valid question as to how VMware’s forthcoming management stack will affect these vendors.

Both Presentation Virtualisation and Desktop Virtualization can be used to provide a Windows desktop experience and to deliver applications, such as Microsoft Office, not only to desktop hardware that might be older but to non-Windows desktops (e.g. Linux PCs. Apple Macs or Thin Client devices). Both virtualization technologies can help your business centrally manage and support applications allowing you to make savings in improved productivity. Moreover, such centralization technologies can extend applications beyond your network – to home workers, to contract staff, to roaming users – and to an ever growing set of devices – be it a netbook, a Windows Mobile device or an iPhone.

Microsoft Windows MultiPoint Server – globally available from March 1, 2010 – is a “shared resource computing solution designed for educational institutions”.  It is a Presentation Virtualization solution based on Windows 2008 server, and sharing codebase with Remote Desktop Server (i.e. the product formerly known as Terminal Services). It is designed to deal with a specific…

I talked extensively to Hyper9 to determine if their product would be a good fit for the SMB as most of their marketing literature is geared towards helping to manage thousands of VMs not necessarily 100s of VMs. My thoughts before talking to them is yes it would be useful, but after talking to them, I discovered some key facts that would help an SMB decide on whether or not to invest in Hyper9 which is a tool to allow you to query the VMware virtual environment for issues as well as general information.

While at RSA Conference I visited the RSA Innovation Sandbox and noticed that three out of ten virtualization security vendors were finalists:

* Altor Networks
* Catbird Security
* HyTrust

Alto Networks won the Innovation Sandbox contest and all that goes with it. Congratulations to them, but Altor’s win is actually a win for all virtualization security players. It shows that virtualization security is extremely important to the data center as well as moving forward to the cloud.

The Cisco-VMware-NetApp (CVN) was discussed on the Virtualization Security Podcast as it pertains to Secure Multi-Tenancy (SMT). This is a major concern that was also discussed at RSA Conference 2010 within the Cloud Security Alliance Summit. The question still remains how to achieve this goal however. CVN is a very good start, but as we discussed on the podcast is missing some key elements.

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